The following Declaration was drafted pursuant to a symposium organized in Panlýurfa by the Human Rights Association of Panlýurfa. The symposium took place on November 22nd and 23rd 2003. We, the co-authors of this Declaration, are deeply concerned about the recent developments at the United Nations regarding the language adopted within various documents regarding women’s rights. The efforts in questioning and undermining already accepted language of the Beijing Conference and Beijing Platform for Action calls for an immediate action by women’s (human) rights defenders.

This booklet offers a comprehensive yet concise overview of the new legal status of women in Turkey.
Semsiye, lapidée par ses proches; Sevide, tuée de deux balles par la famille de son mari; Elif, pendue par sa propre mère: dans le Sud-Est anatolien, les femmes paient encore un lourd tribut à l'honneur.
The Women's Human Rights Training Evaluation Report will serve as a useful tool for all NGOs, activists, academicians and researchers working in areas related to human rights education and social change.
Présentation générale

La Turquie a un système de gouvernement laïc et fonctionne en principe comme une démocratie. Elle demande actuellement à entrer dans l’Union européenne et est déjà partie signataire des accords sur l’unité douanière européenne. Beaucoup de nouvelles lois ont récemment été votées en Turquie, dont un nouveau service de santé national et des lois renforçant les peines en cas de viol et de violence domestique.
Customary and religious laws and practices are often used as tools to control women's sexuality and to maintain the imbalance of power in sexual relations. This paper describes customary and religious laws and beliefs, and their impact on the situation of both rural and urban women in Eastern Turkey, based on a study among 599 women from the region, most of whom are or have been married.
General Outlook

Turkey has a secular system of government and operates nominally as a democracy. It is currently seeking membership in the European Community (EC) and has already become part of EC customs unity agreements. Many new laws have recently been introduced in Turkey, including a new national health service and laws that will increase penalties for rape and domestic violence.

Despite these promising changes, many marginalized groups including ethnic, religious, and sexual minorities, continue to be denied their rights.

In many ways, it is possible to say that feminism has erupted onto the Turkish political scene in the latter half of the 1980’s. Since 1983, a number of publications and public meetings organised by feminists have already made an impact on political and intellectual circles in Istanbul and Ankara (cf. Tekeli 1986 and forthcoming). The general public heard of these women on two separate occasions.
The Turkish Government has rescinded a controversial law that allowed school girls suspected of having pre-marital sex to be given virginity tests.
The reform of the civil code, for which the women's movement in Turkey has been lobbying for many years, has been finally accepted by the Turkish Parliament.
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