We are extremely proud to announce that WLUML networker Yara Sallam has been awarded the North African Human Rights Defender Shield 2013. 

Yara Sallam is a researcher on transitional justice at the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights (EIPR). Yara previously worked as the Women Human Rights Defenders Program manager at Nazra for Feminist Studies (Egypt), a professional legal assistant at the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights (ACHPR) in The Gambia, as researcher on Freedom of Religion and Belief at EIPR, and as a research assistant at the Institute of Research for Development (IRD) focusing on women’s rights in Egypt.

النسويات زي أي بني ادمين يكون آرائهن ومواقفهن من ظروفهن، ونشأتهن، وقراءاتهن، و خبراتهن  ... و سمعت من نسويات كتيرات أن أكتر حد أثر فيها هي أمها أو شخصيات أنثوية تانية زي الجدة، أو العمة، أو المدرسة، إما لانها كانت شخصية أيقونية شديدة القوة وهي اللي قادرة تقود حياتها و حياة عيلتها وأطفالها ... أو لأنها النموذج التاني أي تعرضت للاذي كتير اوي و اتقهرت من مجتمع و شخصيات أبوية .

Egypt is the only country in North Africa where the practise of female genital mutilation remains widespread – despite an official ban and many public information campaigns for women. Anna Kölling reports from Cairo

According to estimates, over 90 per cent of all Egyptian women of childbearing age are affected by genital mutilation. The scale of this practice first became apparent in 1994 with a study conducted on population development and health. Activists have been fighting against female circumcision for decades and, after the popular uprising in early 2011, women's rights once again became a prominent topic in the media. Although women and men have fought side by side on the streets, the rights of women are nevertheless becoming increasingly jeopardised. Ultra-conservative groups, for example, are calling for the lifting of the ban on female circumcision, which was enacted into law in 2008.

في خضم الأحداث التي تجري في مصر منذ 28 حزيران- يونيو و حتى كتابة هذا المقال، تعتري البلاد موجات عنف واستقطاب سياسي حاد، ويتساقط المصريون بانتماءاتهم المختلفة  قتلى ومصابين في صراع يعلم الله متى ينتهي وإلى أي منقلب سننقلب.

بين كل الضحايا الذين سيقوا إلى مذابح -بسبب تشبث طرف بالسلطة وبسبب رغبة أطراف أخرى في إعادة صياغة الموقف السياسي باستخدام البطاقة الأخيرة وهي الحشد  الجماهيري ووضع الطرف الأول أمام الأمر الواقع- لفت نظري بعض الملاحظات لها علاقة بدور النساء في الأحداث الجارية واستخدامهن.

Women’s organisations in Egypt continue the struggle to put women’s rights on the agenda. Recently, 800 women’s organisations met in Cairo to discuss the way forward during this crucial transitional period.

In the end of September, The Kvinna till Kvinna Foundation’s partner organisation Alliance for Arab Women, together with the Solidarity Ministry in Egypt, organised a national conference on women’s role during the transitional period in the country.

”Women are now organised in such a way that they can put pressure on the government. But the conference also showed that NGOs are willing to cooperate with the government, as long as the government is willing to recognize women,” says Hoda Badran, chairperson of Alliance of Arab Women, one of the organisations that Kvinna till Kvinna supports in Egypt.

CAIRO — I LOOKED on, astonished, as a man a few yards away told protesters that he would slaughter me.

He spoke resolutely and enthusiastically, and seemed utterly willing to carry out his promise.

The man, a leader of the Muslim Brotherhood, stood among thousands of stick-waving supporters, their beards long and their faces angry, as they chanted “God is great” and “Down with infidels.” They watched him make the familiar and menacing gesture of tracing his finger across his throat as he said, “We will slaughter Ibrahim Essa.”

The MBC series, which began at the start of Ramadan, includes some realistic and shocking scenes, said Cairo University psychology professor and family relations consultant Waliyuddine Mukhtar.

Eid Without Harassment - Media Statement

By Imprint Movement

'Imprint Movement and Anti-Sexual Harassment movement launched a campaign called "Eid without Harassment" which took place on Talaat harb square and street on the 9th and 10th of August from 4pm until 10pm. 

We divided ourselves between 3 teams; patrolling, awareness and operations. We spoke and interacted with bystanders on the importance of rejecting this crime and rejecting violence. 

As a young Egyptian woman who participated in the revolution and who has been involved with several women’s groups and initiatives that have proliferated during the past two years, I do not wish to talk about how great the participation of Egyptian women was during the revolution, how they were marginalized afterward, or how they faced violence and a setback in political rights and freedoms despite their numerous contributions. These are all issues that I am sure can be addressed by experts in a more holistic and professional way.

لَقِّم المحتوى