"The number of women who dare to file for divorce and separation is very limited, and restricted only to Kabul and a few major cities," said Fawzia Siddiqui, a member of parliament.
The Mauritanian government must take additional measures to ensure a new law criminalizing slavery has an effect, human rights activists say.
Updates and Clarifications: There has been considerable confusion on various aspects of this case and the situation Shahzina Tariq and Shamial Raj are in, especially since people in Pakistan and elsewhere have been misinformed. Nighat Said Khan of the ASR Resource Centre clarifies:
Women in Nepal’s minority Muslim community are increasingly contesting through the courts the divorce settlements imposed on them by their husbands. The women say they are the victims of an abuse of Islamic law by their husbands.
Délaissée, marginalisée, mise à l'écart, dans le domaine foncier, la femme, au Burundi, n'a pas voix au chapitre. Deux communes de la province de Ngozi, à savoir Mwumba et Ruhororo, permettent d'étayer cette affirmation.
The Dutch Labour Party has been trying to muzzle a young member who is fighting for the rights and safety of Muslim apostates.
Le CICADE [Centre pour l'initiative citoyenne et l'accès au(x) droit(s) des exclus] vient d'éditer un guide juridique consacré au droit de la famille des femmes françaises et maghrébines.
Women Living Under Muslim Laws supports Shamial Raj and Shahzina Tariq who were sentenced by Lahore High Court (LHC) to three years rigorous imprisonment and Rs 10,000 fine on charges of perjury. Presently, Shahzina is imprisoned in Central Jail, Faisalabad, and Shamial in Kot Lakpath, Lahore.
Uganda's Supreme Court recently nullified a law that made adultery criminal for women, but not men. The constitutional case also strengthened women's rights on divorce and inheritance.
"Registering customary marriages provides women with the legal right to own property and other rights in marriage, making this a great step forward for rural women in particular."
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