This paper attempts to find an association between the absence of federal and provincial laws in the Federally Administered Tribal Area (FATA) of Pakistan and denial of land ownership rights to women.  It discusses various forms of collective and individual land ownership keeping in view features of Pukhtun culture affecting the status of women. It shall also compare land ownership of Pukhtun women in NWFP where the law allows women to inherit and own property with the absence of landownership of women in tribal areas.

This paper explores statistically the implications of the shift from communal to individualized tenure on the distribution of land and schooling between sons and daughters in matrilineal societies, based on a Sumatra case study. The inheritance system is evolving from a strictly matrilineal system to a more egalitarian system in which sons and daughters inherit the type of land that is more intensive in their own work effort. While gender bias is either non-existent or small in land inheritance, daughters tend to be disadvantaged with respect to schooling.

This paper was presented at the International Conference on Land and Resource Tenure, Jakarta, 11-13 October 2004. The writer was part of a panel of women speaking on the theme of women and tenurial rights. For further information see www.landtenure.net, and link below.

This article discusses the division of joint matrimonial property under Indonesian national law and acehnese customary law and the need for greater awareness of this law amongst women to prevent injustice to women.
While much has been written about the relation between Islamic law and customary law in Muslim countries for the most part, the literature reflects the conflict approach. To date, this methodological framework persists as most western Islamicists continue to view the encounter between the two legal systems as conflict ridden. This thesis is an attempt to reevaluate this entrenched paradigm.
In this article Lev argues that in the absence of legislative reform, Indonesian customary law (adat) has been susceptible to the changing ideals and imagination of the country’s elite and that for this to happen certain changes have been necessary in the conception Indonesian judges have of their own role in relation to adat law with particular reference to adapt inheritance law.
Numerous titling and registration programs have been implemented in Latin America, Africa, Asia, and Eastern Europe as a necessary measure to ensure the property rights of smallholders and increase their access to other production factors, particularly credit. A major criticism of titling programs and formal property rights institutions (such as property registries), however, is their tendency to grant title for household landed property to just one person in the household, usually the male head of household.
This paper is based on extensive fieldwork in tsunami-affected Aceh, Indonesia, between August 2006 and January 2007, and focuses on two key land rights issues for women in tsunami-affected Aceh: inheritance and documentation of land rights.
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