Violence against women

File 3659

 

On the fateful afternoon of Friday 27th October, in the southern district of Saakow, Habiba Ali Isaq, a 30 year old mother of eight children, was stoned to death for alleged adultery against her husband, Ali Ibrahim. According to her husband, Isaq was living in Hagar village in Jubbar with her children when she left her marital home to Mogadishu to visit relatives. Ibrahim claimed that his wife then got married to another man in a different village named Nus Duniya after disappearing for 18 days.

ISLAMABAD: The Senate Standing Committee on Interior on Wednesday rejected ‘The Child Marriage Restraint (Amendment) Bill, 2017’ and said it was un-Islamic.

The bill was rejected even though the mover of the bill was not present though three other bills were deferred for the same reason.

The chairman of the committee, Rehman Malik said the bill, which suggests increasing the minimum age for girls to marry from 16 to 18, was contrary to Islamic injunctions.

In March 2015, a violent, hysterical mob beat, torched, and killed a woman, ran her over with a car, made her face unrecognizable, and threw her corpse in the Kabul river. Thousands of onlookers watched on like it was a spectacle to be enjoyed, not intervening, and hence, adding to the brutality.

The woman’s crime? “Burning the Quran”—which, as substantial evidence proved later, was an entirely false allegation.

APRIL 5, 2016

(Beirut) – The extremist armed group Islamic State should urgently release Yezidi women and girls they abducted in 2014, Human Rights Watch said today, following new research with recent escapees who were raped and traded between members before they fled. Islamic State (also known as ISIS) also routinely imposes abusive restrictions on other Iraqi women and girls and severely limits their freedom of movement and access to health care and education in areas under its control, Human Rights Watch said today.

Originally found on The Guardian

File 3546

Sharmeen Obaid Chinoy: ‘‘The problem with ‘honour’ killings is that people hush them up: a father kills a daughter, and no one ever files a case.’

 

Introduction

The issue of Violence against Women in the public sphere has been a major source of concern over the past few years, especially in the four years following the January 25th Revolution in 2011. Discussion of what Women have to endure in the public sphere became commonplace on many platforms, including the media and social networking sites. It has also become a leading item on the agendas of many feminist organizations and various groups which seek to confront the exacerbating and increasingly frequent phenomenon.

لندن ـ كاتيا حداد

الخميس ,04 شباط / فبراير 2016

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