Tools for Activists

Discussions covered interpretation and jurisprudence, foundational myths, the process of Muslim jurisprudence relating to women in the family and women in society, and action and strategies. According to participants, the need for women to review the process of interpretation and claim their right to interpret arises out of the realities of women’s lives and the myth that there is one way of being in the Muslim world.

Many thousands in the Muslim community in Britain as well as non-British spouses of British Muslims may be in marriages or undergo divorces whose legal validity is doubtful in the eyes of the English courts and authorities such as immigration and pensions. This leaves them in a ‘married/un-married’ limbo, often referred to in legal terms as ‘limping marriages’. This publication includes articles on: British Law; Laws in Bangladesh, India and Pakistan; and European and International Law.

The papers relate to a variety of contexts and global issues: Afghanistan, Algeria, Austria, Bangladesh, Egypt, Gambia, India, Iran, Malaysia, Nigeria, Palestine, Rwanda, South Africa, USA, Yugoslavia, Lesbian Gay Bisexual and Transgender identities, multiculturalism, the Internet, as well as fundamentalisms in Catholic, Hindu and Jewish contexts.

Co-organised by the Center for Women’s Global Leadership & Women Living Under Muslim Laws the first two Feminism in the Muslim World Leadership Institutes took place in 1998 in Istanbul, Turkey and in 1999 in Lagos, Nigeria.

Ce manuel offre des outils aux militantes et défenseurs des droits humains qui enquêtent sur les violences perpétrées contre les femmes par des acteurs non étatiques.

This guide is organized in two sections. In Part one we present the history of the WLUML Network, and examine and assess various forms and levels of public participation for upholding and expanding social justice. We discuss different levels of public action and give examples from different countries. Part Two reviews several methods used by social activists around the world, outlines basic principles for preparing and publicizing various forms of solidarity action, and evaluates the limitations and effectiveness of each.

The essential information and training kit on women's rights activists from the 8th to the 20th century. This publication, jointly produced by Shirkat Gah Women's Resource Centre and WLUML, explodes the myth that struggles for women's rights are alien to societies that embraced Islam and profiles women who defied and changed the contours of women's lives from the 8th to the mid-20th century.

This guide is organized in two sections. In Part one we present the history of the WLUML Network, and examine and assess various forms and levels of public participation for upholding and expanding social justice. We discuss different levels of public action and give examples from different countries. Part Two reviews several methods used by social activists around the world, outlines basic principles for preparing and publicizing various forms of solidarity action, and evaluates the limitations and effectiveness of each.

An action-oriented publication, this booklet examines some of the central themes which are integral to the status of women in Muslim societies: the multiple sources and forms of law; family, patriarchy, and laws; women and the culture of violence; nationalism, identity, and women; political and social dynamics of power. It also details a number of strategies, both successful and less successful, which have been used by women in Muslim societies to meet the challenges they face.

In much of the Muslim world, women's lack of knowledge about statutory provisions and about the sources of customs and practices applied in their immediate community obstructs their ability to change their circumstances. This understanding was the basis for the Women & Law in the Muslim World Programme of the international solidarity network, Women Living Under Muslim Laws (WLUML).

لَقِّم المحتوى