This is a material on the reclassification of FGM: the Local to Global Nature of the practice. It looks at the misunderstanding, confusion, and controversy over the complex dimensions of FGM that remain unresolved.

This material gives concise information about FGM in Arab countries. It is available in English and Arabic and facilitates a call for action to eradicate FGM

This report deals with law reform processes in legislating FGM. It gives background information on the types of laws in some African countries, including those without specific laws against FGM. 

شبكة النساء في ظل قوانين المسلمين"في حاجة ماسة للموارد المالية لتغطية تكاليف خدمات الاتصالات والمنشورات التي هي محور عملنا، وخصوصا في ظل التطورات السياسية الأخيرة والفرص المتاحة من أجل حقوق المرأة والديمقراطية عبر السياقات الإسلامية.

WLUML a besoin, de toute urgence, des fonds pour couvrir ses frais de communication et de publication qui constituent les secteurs les plus importants de son travail, surtout avec les évènements politiques récents et les chances de promouvoir les droits des femmes et la démocratie dans les contextes musulmans.

This is a training kit that provides steps to addressing FGM amongst immigrant families in Europe. It also provides case studies of girls affected by the practice in different countries. 

This book explores the various forms of FGM practice, as well as the terminologies and issues reinforcing the practice in Africa. It also includes the testimony of an ex-circumciser from The Gambia. It explores the rituals associated with the practice in the local context, as well as age and ethnicity issues with regards to FGM.

During the course of history, and in more contemporary times, a large number of honour killings have been reported from the Mediterranean, Latin American, and certain Muslim societies. However, research suggests it is an error to view the practice as being peculiar to a certain geographical region or belief system. Pakistan is one of the countries where the incidents of honour killing are among the highest in the contemporary world.

Since the start of the wave of uprisings that have swept the Arab world, "establishment" figures, especially women, have been celebrated as the "icons" of the revolution – symbols of its homegrown, indigenous nature. Tawakkol Karman in Yemen, and Saida Saadouni in Tunisia are examples of this fierce matriarchy. They are of the tradition, and respected more so because of it. Hijab-clad, religiously conservative and socially conventional, they reserve their rebellion for the political arena, rendering them relatively immune to accusations of immorality or harsh personal attacks.

Al-Qaida has confirmed the death of its leader, Osama bin Laden, and vowed veangance, pledging in a statement posted on militant websites that his blood "will not be wasted". In what is apparently the first official reaction from the militant Isamist group since Bin Laden was gunned down by US special forces troops who raided his hideout in the Pakistani town of Abbottabad, the group called on the people of Pakistan, "where Sheik Osama was killed", to rise up against their leaders. The group would soon release an audio message from Bin Laden recorded a week before his death, said the statement, dated 3 May and signed by "the general leadership of al-Qaida". There was no independent confirmation that the message was authentic but it was posted on websites through which al-Qaida habitually issues statements.

لَقِّم المحتوى