middle east and north africa

One: Gender is not the study of what is evident, it is an analysis of how what is evident came to be.

Two: Before resolving to write about gender, sexuality, or any other practice or aspect of subjectivity in the Middle East, one must first define what exactly the object of study is. Be specific. What country, region, and time period forms the background picture of your study? Furthermore, the terms “Middle East,” “the Islamic World” and the “Arab world” do not refer to the same place, peoples, or histories, but the linkages between them are crucial. Moreover, the “state” is a relatively new phenomenon in the Middle East. In order to study gendered political economy in Syria, for example, one must be aware of the Ottoman and regional history that has produced this gendered political economy in the area that we now call “Syria.”

عزيزي كينيث روث

في مقدمة تقرير هيومن رايتس واتش 2012، "حان الوقت للتخلي عن المستبدين واحتضان الحقوق"، فإنك تدعو لدعم الحكومات الجديدة التي جاءت بالإخوان المسلمين للسلطة في مصر وتونس. ومن أجل تلبية رغبة "المشاركة البناءة" مع هذه الحكومات الجديدة، فإنك تدعو الدول لوقف مساندة المستبدين. لكنك لست دولة بل مدير مؤسسة دولية لحقوق الإنسان وعليك أن تلعب دورا في الإبلاغ عن انتهاكات حقوق الإنسان، وهي مهمة شريفة وضرورية تم تجاهلها في مقالك بشكل واضح.

Dear Kenneth Roth,

In your Introduction to Human Rights Watch’s World Report 2012, “Time to Abandon the Autocrats and Embrace Rights,” you urge support for the newly elected governments that have brought the Muslim Brotherhood to power in Tunisia and Egypt. In your desire to “constructively engage” with the new governments, you ask states to stop supporting autocrats. But you are not a state; you are the head of an international human rights organization whose role is to report on human rights violations, an honorable and necessary task which your essay largely neglects.

Under the banner of “No Spring without Women,” a Lebanese feminist organisation has organized a march in Beirut, as part of the 5th New Arab Woman Forum. The slogan of the march is “Sawa Sawa”, which in this context means “Let’s walk together, let’s make it together”, calling for a Spring that includes both men and women. Before getting the invitation to this march, my mind was already preoccupied with the future of Arab women after the revolutions and how women’s status might be impacted in each of the Arab countries. My concern is: can there be Arab union or organisation to sustain Arab women’s status in the post-revolution era?

Avez-vous remarqué la soudaine disparition des femmes de ce paradoxal printemps arabe depuis qu'il a tourné au vert, la couleur de la victoire islamiste ? C'est à croire que le scénariste n'a prévu pour elles que les larmes, la douleur et les chants funèbres du dernier quart d'heure des despotes. Elles étaient pourtant très comme il faut sur les images des télévisions occidentales et conformes aux canons en vigueur concernant le port vestimentaire.

FOR A FREE AND SECULAR MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA

76 secularists and human rights campaigners, including Mina Ahadi, Nawal El Sadaawi, Marieme Helie Lucas, Hameeda Hussein, Ayesha Imam, Maryam Jamil, Maryam Namazie, Taslima Nasrin, Farida Shaheed, Fatou Sow, and Stasa Zajovic have signed on to a Manifesto for a Free and Secular Middle East and North Africa.

لَقِّم المحتوى