The United Nations agreed on Friday that all members should pass and enforce laws banning child marriages, resolving to end a practice that affects about 15 million girls every year.

In preparation for the 59th session of the UN Commission on the Status of Women in March 2015, CWGL drafted a statement to encourage UN Member States to fulfill their human rights obligations toward the full realization of women’s rights.

Brunei Darussalam’s record on women’s rights will be examined by the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) for the first time on Wednesday 29 October 2014 in meetings that will be webcast live.

The new High Commissioner has the opportunity to grasp the torch lit by his predecessors and fully embrace and defend an uncompromising stance for women’s equality - and his legacy will be judged on his commitment to doing so.

Eight WLUML networkers from Sudan, Iraq, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Nigeria headed to Geneva this month to take part in the two-week Human Rights Defenders Advocacy Programme hosted by the International Service for Human Rights.  Under the Women’s Empowerment and Leadership Development for Democratisation (WELDD) programme, WLUML sent their networkers to join 12 other participants from around the world working on diverse issues such as indigenous and environmental rights, corporate responsibility, and LGBTI rights. 

Jennifer Allsopp: Yakin, you were invited to Oxford to deliver the annual Barbara Harrell-Bond lecture at the Refugee Studies Centre. You stressed in your talk, and have repeatedly argued elsewhere, that violence against women is a human rights issue. Could you say something more about the relationship between violence against women and human rights?

The Commission on the Status of Women agrees to stand-alone equality goal in post-2015 targets and issues strong language against violence

Liz Ford, Sunday 23rd March 2014

UN Member states have agreed that gender equality and women's rights must be prioritised in future discussions on what should be included in the next set of sustainable development goals.

On 22 January 2014, the United Nations (UN)-backed Geneva II peace talks between the Syrian government and the opposition are scheduled to be held with the goal of ending the Syrian conflict and creating a transitional government. However, nearly 14 years after the landmark passage of  UN Security Council resolution 1325 (UNSCR 1325) calling on UN member states to “increase the participation of women and incorporate gender perspectives in all United Nations peace and security efforts,” no women have been included in the Syrian peace negotiations.

 
What is follow-up and why is it important?
 
Follow-up activities aim at ensuring that recommendations and decisions by human rights mechanisms and bodies are implemented so as to
improve respect, protection and fulfilment of all human rights for all. UN human rights mechanisms and bodies seek to improve the
realization of human rights in all countries of the world. Resolutions adopted by the Human Rights Council, the findings of Commissions of
Inquiry, recommendations of treaty bodies, special procedures and the universal periodic review, and decisions of treaty bodies on individual
cases all aim at closing protection gaps and indicate ways for States and other stakeholders to advance towards the full realization of human
rights. All these findings, recommendations and decisions aim at producing a change for the better in the lives of rights-holders. The primary obligation to realize such change lies with States, which bear the duty to respect, protect and fulfil human rights. However, all parts of society, from individuals to the private sector, the international community and CSAs have a role to play in the realization of human rights. Civil  society, in particular, can play a crucial role in following up on human rights recommendations.

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