Religious leaders from four different faiths – Hindu, Buddhist, Christian and Muslim – denounce child marriage in a new video by UNFPA and UNICEF Nepal.

In the video, the leaders take an unequivocal stand against child marriage in Nepal, explaining that children do not have the physical, psychological or social maturity needed to enter marriage.

The announcement will be played on national television, radio and on the Internet in Nepal, a Hindu-majority country where 40% of girls are married before their eighteenth birthday.

Nepalese women are among thousands of Asians who travel to the Middle East in search of employment. They often arrive willingly, but subsequently face conditions that the U.S. State Department says is indicative of forced labor -- the withholding of passports, restrictions on movement, nonpayment of wages for work up to 20 hours a day, threats, deprivation of food and sleep, and physical or sexual abuse.

Sexual harassment is an everyday issue for women in Nepal, particularly in urban areas. Although exact numbers are unavailable, activists say the problem is on the rise and are demanding change. 

“Harassment is all over Nepal against women and the problem is big. It’s more of a problem where more people live, but it really is everywhere, and it is growing,” said Pratiya Rana, 22, a university student and an organizer of the country’s recent “Walk for Respect” demonstration, the Nepali version of Toronto's SlutWalk, the international protest movement. 

The study reviews the formal and customary laws and practices governing the rights of women to inherit land in six South Asian countries (Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka). The study includes an analysis of existing laws and customs and their impact on inheritance and land rights in all six countries. It also provides recommendations for how to design interventions that can attempt to improve women’s inheritance rights.

The National Alliance of Women Human Rights Defenders (NAWHRDs) organized a small ceremony on 7 June in Maitighar Mandala to commemorate Laxmi Bohara, Women Human Rights Defender, Kanchanpur who was murdered on the same date by her husband.
The United Nations human rights office has urged Nepalese authorities to ensure the safety of the wife and others involved in a domestic violence case.
Hundreds of divorced Muslim women demand the same rights as men during two days of protest against ‘talak’. Islamic divorce allows husbands to repudiate their wives, throw them out of the house without any support.
The following is an update on the situation in the Kanchanpur district of Nepal where women human rights defender Laxmi Bohara was murdered by her husband and mother-in-law. Further women activists are now being threatened and attacked.
The National Alliance of Women Human Rights Defenders (NAWHRDs) requests your urgent intervention in the following situation in Nepal. NAWHRDs is shocked and appalled about death of Ms. Laxmi Bohara, 28, a member of Women Human Rights Defender Network, Kanchanpur and a resident of Champapur, Ward No. 8, Daji Village Development Committee in Kanchanpur district. She was severely beaten and physically injured by her husband and mother-in-law and later died in the zone hospital.
The Badis are a small Dalit community, considered a minority group and are the most disadvantaged ethnic groups in Nepal. The women earn most of their families' income through sex work. During a peaceful protest on 27-Aug-07 they were beaten by police.
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