This network seeks for violence against women to be understood as a human rights violation within Senegal; the revision and amendment of laws that are discriminatory to women; the passage of laws that promote gender equality; and women’s increased participation in decision-making processes. The name Siggil Jigeen has much significance within Senegalese ‘culture’; it expresses the promotion of the status of women. ‘Siggil’ means enhance, rehabilitate, promote, defend women, and by extension, the family and society.

GREFELS’ mission is to promote feminist research and campaigning in Senegal. They focus on issues related to citizenship and law reform (including those of family, sexual and reproductive rights of women), laws and cultural norms and religious gender-based violence (including forced marriage, domestic violence, and fundamentalisms), trafficking and the sexual exploitation of women and girls, and female migration. GREFELS is also the WLUML RCO-AME.


The Committee’s aim is to eradicate all forms of violence against women and children (sexual, physical, moral, forced and early marriages, trafficking, sexual exploitaion, etc.). They also work to support women and children victions of violence (through their own counselling centre), as well as monitor that laws are enforced. They hold informative talks and training seminars, as well as annual/bi-annual conferences with, for example, priests, Islamic scholars, sociologists, and laywers.

APROFES works to promote women’s rights; women’s access to resources; women’s participation in decision-making; poverty reduction; and fight violence against women within the framework of women’s rights as human rights. They work with local women’s groups, women’s victims of violence, and women leaders and entrepreneurs; they have a people-centred advocacy response anchored in the community, where it can have more widespread and long-lasting effects.

IAC- NIGERIA is a National NGO with operational presence in 26 states of the country; as an affiliate of IAC African Region it is committed to the elimination of all Harmful Traditional Practices (HTPS) that impinge on the reproductive health, rights and well-being of women and children and also raising the socio economic and political status of women. This is achieved through Advocacy and Social Mobilization, Capacity Building Workshops, Training, Information, Education, Communication (TIEC) Campaign and Research.

A women’s human rights organization that focuses on women’s legal rights issues under the three (3) systems of law – customary, statutory and religious laws in Nigeria. The organization evolved from an ad hoc group of activists, social scientists, lawyers, and specialists in Muslim laws and Arabic who were responsible for executing the Women and Laws Nigeria project, under the auspices of the International Solidarity Network of Women Living Under Muslim Laws from 1993 to 1996. In 1996, BAOBAB as presently constituted formally came into being.

Le G.A.M.S est une association Loi 1901. Elle est constituée de femmes africaines et de femmes françaises ayant des compétences dans les champs de la santé, du social, de l’éducation, et une longue expérience de prévention des mutilations génitales féminines. Le G.A.M.S. est financé par le Service des Droits des Femmes et le Fonds d’Action Sociale. Il regroupe 26 comités nationaux sur les pratiques traditionnelles affectant la santé des femmes et des enfants. Le CI-AF a été créé à Dakar en 1984.

The debate over land reform in Africa is embedded in evolutionary models, in which it is assumed landholding systems are evolving into individualized systems of ownership with greater market integration. This process is seen to be occurring even without state protection of private land rights through titling. Gender as an analytical category is excluded in evolutionary models. Women are accommodates only in their dependent positions as the wives of landholders in idealized ‘households’.
This article examines some contemporary policy discourses on land tenure reform in sub–Saharan Africa and their implications for women’s interests in land. It demonstrates an emerging consensus among a range of influential policy institutions, lawyers and academics about the potential of so–called customary systems of land tenure to meet the needs of all land users and claimants.
This book brings together ongoing research into rural African women and land rights, with the aim of contributing towards gender equity and the economic independence and human rights of African women. It looks at a number of countries: from West and East Africa and the Horn; Islamic and non-Islamic. The contributors examine women‘s land rights in theory and practice in each country, highlight the key issues and make recommendations.
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