An open letter from Nicaraguan feminists calling for letters of support from regional and international groups:
Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah has pardoned a female rape victim who had been sentenced to 200 lashes for being alone with a man at the time of the attack who was not related to her. Saudi Justice Minister Abdullah bin Muhammed al-Sheik told al-Jazirah newspaper that the pardon does not mean the king doubted the country's judges, but instead acted in the ''interests of the people.''
Following strong protests from women's and left-wing groups, a US marine has been sentenced to 40 years in prison for raping a local woman in the Philippines last year. About 100 protesters were outside the courthouse for the verdict.
According to the Defense Committee of Malalai Joya, on 14 April 2006, the staff of Malalai Joya's office in Farah province uncovered a plot planned by Joya's opponents against her.
Malalai Joya is a member of the Afghan parliament which comprises mostly warlords and fundamentalists who are directly or indirectly involved in the gross violations of human rights in Afghanistan. They currently dominate new parliament using their guns, power, money and intimidation.
We have received the following call for action from friends in Canada who ask that we write letters to Dr. Martha Bailey protesting her recommendation that the Federal Government of Canada remove Section 293 from the Criminal Code of Canada, thus, decriminalizing polygamy in Canada.
WLUML is relieved to learn of the release of Giuliana Sgrena but concerned about reports that her car was fired on by US forces leaving her injured and a negotiator dead.
The text of the detailed judgment released by the Federal Shariat Court (FSC) in the case of Zafran Bibi.
Toujan al-Faisal has been released and vows to continue the fight against corruption.
Mehrangiz Kar, journalist and Iranian women's rights activist, who was jailed in April 2000 for her writings and speeches on women's rights, was allowed to leave Iran for medical treatment for breast cancer in fall 2001. After she arrived in the United States, her husband, journalist Siamak Pourzand, was disappeared. He was brought to the phone a number of times to call Mehrangiz and their daughters Leila and Azadeh to pass on the message that they must refrain from speaking on his behalf and must avoid contact with the media.
لَقِّم المحتوى