Other Publications

Discussions covered interpretation and jurisprudence, foundational myths, the process of Muslim jurisprudence relating to women in the family and women in society, and action and strategies. According to participants, the need for women to review the process of interpretation and claim their right to interpret arises out of the realities of women’s lives and the myth that there is one way of being in the Muslim world.

Many thousands in the Muslim community in Britain as well as non-British spouses of British Muslims may be in marriages or undergo divorces whose legal validity is doubtful in the eyes of the English courts and authorities such as immigration and pensions. This leaves them in a ‘married/un-married’ limbo, often referred to in legal terms as ‘limping marriages’. This publication includes articles on: British Law; Laws in Bangladesh, India and Pakistan; and European and International Law.

Over 50 women participated from 22 countries - Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Canada, Egypt, Gambia, Iran, Iraq, Israel-Palestine, Malaysia, Mali, Morocco, Nigeria, Pakistan, Senegal, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Tanzania, UK, and USA. Many dozens more contributed to the PoA through regional and country-specific meetings that preceded the Senegal meeting.

Please note the following correction for this article: Tahar Djaout, assasinated in 1993, was a male journalist.
Syndiquer le contenu