Other Publications

This guide is organized in two sections. In Part one we present the history of the WLUML Network, and examine and assess various forms and levels of public participation for upholding and expanding social justice. We discuss different levels of public action and give examples from different countries. Part Two reviews several methods used by social activists around the world, outlines basic principles for preparing and publicizing various forms of solidarity action, and evaluates the limitations and effectiveness of each.

An action-oriented publication, this booklet examines some of the central themes which are integral to the status of women in Muslim societies: the multiple sources and forms of law; family, patriarchy, and laws; women and the culture of violence; nationalism, identity, and women; political and social dynamics of power. It also details a number of strategies, both successful and less successful, which have been used by women in Muslim societies to meet the challenges they face.

In much of the Muslim world, women's lack of knowledge about statutory provisions and about the sources of customs and practices applied in their immediate community obstructs their ability to change their circumstances. This understanding was the basis for the Women & Law in the Muslim World Programme of the international solidarity network, Women Living Under Muslim Laws (WLUML).

Outlines proposed egalitarian family and personal status laws in the Maghreb and presents a synthesis of thematic reports jointly produced by a number of researchers from Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia.

La montée persistante de la menace des courants extrémistes religieux politisés et leur projet d’imposer une vision particulière de l’Islam par le biais de l’institution d’un Etat théocratique et/ou par l’usage de la violence et la terreur.

Women, their roles and above all, their control, are at the heart of the fundamentalist agenda. That they should conform to the strict confines of womanhood within the fundamentalist religious code is a precondition of maintaining and reproducing the fundamentalist version of society.

In October 1997 35 active networkers from 18 countries met in Dhaka to develop the third WLUML Plan of Action. We re-examined old concerns and identified emerging ones. We strategized about how best we could answer these needs knowing that we must act in the face of odds that sometimes seem overwhelming in our own specific locations.

Submitted to the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), this Shadow Report focuses on one of the central obstacles to women’s equality and advancement: the rise and ongoing threat of politicised, violent religious fundamentalism and its project to impose its particular view of Islam through the theocratization of the State and/or through violence and terror.

Subtitled 'The Right of the Divorced Muslim Women to Mataa', this is the case of an Indian Sunni woman who filled a petition in the Supreme Court arguing that the Muslim minority law applied to her in her divorce denied her rights otherwise guaranteed by the Constitution of India to all citizens.

This book analyses legal campaigns and cases in a number of Asian, Middle Eastern and North African countries, and describes a strategy for challenging these laws – delegation to the wife of the right to pronounce divorce on the behalf of her husband on their marriage – to equalise the right to divorce.

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