Turkey

By Mark Lowen,  1 June 2015

For years it has been their ritual - women who lost children and husbands in 30 years of armed conflict between the Kurds and the Turkish state.I meet them in Diyarbakir - the final stop of our election trip across Turkey.Age and exhaustion are etched on their faces. One wears a necklace with a picture of her missing children. Another has a bracelet bearing the Kurdish flag."Turkey doesn't think we Kurds are humans", says Sakine Arat, 80, who lost four sons and one daughter in the fighting. "We've tried all the political parties but none sided with us. Now we've found one - the HDP - that treats us as equals. So we will vote for it."The People's Democratic Party (HDP) is the one to watch in Turkey's election on Sunday.Its roots and support base are Kurdish but it has broadened out, becoming a powerful voice of the Turkish left.

June 02 2015

AMED – With a recent increase in threats against reporters for JINHA, Turkey and Kurdistan's only all-women and women-oriented news agency, JINHA reporters say those threatening them are doing so because they fear the threat that women-oriented reporting poses to male power.

 Umut Uras, 01 June 2015

A decision by Turkey's top court to allow citizens to be religiously married without a legally binding civil marriage has triggered uproar among the country's legal and human rights circles, who argue that the move would threaten the rights of women and children in the country.

Men at a protest condemning violence against women marched down İstiklal Avenue sporting skirts in a demonstration of solidarity for women's rights on Saturday in İstanbul.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has said equality between men and women is “against nature” at a summit in Istanbul.

He sparked outrage with the speech made at a convention organised by women’s groups campaigning to eliminate gender discrimination in all its forms.

Latifa Akay

‘Give women free guns!’  - It was one of those headlines that catches your eye, but not in a particularly good way. I read on with a feeling of unease I have learnt to associate with discussions of domestic violence in Turkey. The head of a women’s shelter, Şefkat-Der, it transpired – had suggested that women in fear of their lives be issued with licensed guns and receive state-funded shooting lessons as a last ditch effort to cut down on the murders of women.

We deplore the recent crackdown of the Turkish government on its own citizens, the clearly unjustified use of tear gas, acts of force, gas canisters and smoke bombs that have resulted in a vast number of injuries, imperiling the lives of those who seek to exercise their basic freedoms of assembly and protest.  

In Turkey, a women's rights group has petitioned parliament for the creation of a male brothel. The call has heated up the discussion over whether the state should run brothels at all.

Turkey has a high-profile pilot project to ward off domestic assault. Safety advocates say it won't work as long as victims continue to be routinely disbelieved and mistreated.

Pursuant to a month of heated discussions, Turkish government stated that they will not amend the existing laws on abortion in Turkey and restricted their changes to the subject of making caesar sections more difficult to implement. Social media whirled about a few days, press immediately forgot about the issue, but the snake never slept.

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