Fundamentalisms

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Edited by Algerian sociologist and WLUML founder, Marieme Hélie-Lucas, this bumper dossier brings you papers by over 15 contributors, including Karima Bennoune: The Law of the Republic Versus the ‘Law of the Brothers': A story of France’s law banning religious symbols in public; Pragna Patel: Cohesion, Multi-Faithism and the Erosion of Secular Spaces in the UK: Implications for the human rights of minority women; and Gita Sahgal: ‘The Question Asked by Satan’: Doubt, dissent and discrimination in 21st-century Britain

 

Exciting news.

Deeyah Khan's fascinating documentary about the Council of Ex-Muslims in Britain and the discrimination they have faced in the UK and abroad has been shortlisted for the Asian Media Awards in Investigative Journalism.

Building on her previous report on diverse forms of fundamentalism and extremism as threats to cultural rights, the Special Rapporteur elaborates on their grave impact on the cultural rights of women. She stresses that a human rights-based response to fundamentalism and extremism must by fully gender sensitive, centering the cultural rights and equality of women, and defending universality. Women’s human rights, including cultural rights, are an essential part of the fight against fundamentalism and extremism, without which it cannot succeed.

 

This special issue is based on a series of symposia on Gender and Fundamentalisms conducted over the last four years on different aspects of the relationship between gender and fundamentalisms. These symposia took place once a semester at SOAS and were organised by Nira YuvalDavis from the Centre for Research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging (CMRB) of the University of East London and Nadje Al-Ali from the Centre of Gender Studies (CGS) at SOAS University of London.

Marieme Helie Lucas 

July 2, 2017

2017. This year, Saudi Arabia will defend women’s rights in the Commission on the Status of Women, and UN Women will support the right to disappear women behind a veil. Aren’t we lucky?

From its official Twitter account, UN Women tweeted an article posted online on Jul 2 2017, 4:17pm at:

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Sultana Kamal is a brave lawyer and activist standing up for human rights in Bangladesh. She’s not afraid to take the spotlight on national television and debate the need for fair justice and human rights for all of Bangladesh – men, women and children.

But peacefully expressing her opinion has gained her the attention of those who want to stifle such activities. She’s now been threatened with violence from Islamist group, Hefazat-e-Islam.

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Human rights groups have warned about the safety of a prominent Bangladeshi lawyer after Islamist leaders threatened to “break every bone” in her body for defending the installation of a Lady Justice statue outside the country’s supreme court.

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Source: Women’s Political Participation Committee in Afghanistan

January 21, 2016- Kabul, Afghanistan 

By Zainab SalbiNov 17 2015

According to Edward Lorenz’s chaos theory, the butterfly effect is defined as the “sensitive dependence on initial conditions in which a small change in one state of a deterministic nonlinear system can result in large differences in a later state.”Well, you may ask what does that have to do with ISIS and women in the Middle East. Consider ISIS as the small change that is impacting the larger system of how women live their lives in profound and turbulent ways.
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