Tajikistan

Financial pressures add to commonly-held view that girls need education less than boys. Khosiat Najmiddinova’s two younger daughters may never finish school, as she sees education as a priority only for her sons. “To be honest, the children don’t have the clothes to go to school,” said the mother of six from the Tajik capital Dushanbe. “As well as clothing, they also need school stuff, and I can’t afford to provide it for all of them.”

Married women in Tajikistan are being deprived of property rights, especially if they get married without going through the legal formalities.
On 23 May 2008, the Special Rapporteur of the United Nations Human Rights Council on Violence against Women, its Causes and Consequences, Yakin Ertürk, delivered the following statement:
Prof. Yakin Ertürk, the Special Rapporteur of the United Nations Human Rights Council on Violence against Women, its Causes and Consequences, will conduct an official visit to Tajikistan, at the invitation of the Government, from 15 to 23 May 2008.
Only when Tajikistan breaks down the walls of silence and prejudice surrounding HIV/AIDS can it hope to slow infection rates.
As more and more suicides among women are attributed to violence in the home, pressure is building for a law to end the climate of impunity.
This report focuses polygamy in Tajikistan. The research was carried out by the women’s NGO “Traditions and Modernity” within the project “Providing Support to Women and Reduction of Violence Against Women in Tajikistan” supported by SDC.
Participants in a roundtable on equality between men and women in Tajikistan have stressed the need for accessible and fast mechanisms for enforcing legal provisions.
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