Egypt

After spending most of the past 18 months in prison, Egypt's most prominent advocate for democracy and human rights, Saad Eddin Ibrahim, has been freed by the country's highest criminal court.
The second trial of 50 of the "Cairo 52" men continued in Cairo today. The 50 defendants include both those who were acquitted as well as those who were convicted in an earlier trial that ended November 14, 2001.
Dr. Saad Eddin Ibrahim and 27 associates at the Ibn Khaldun Centre for Developmental Studies (ICDS) were first arrested on June 30, 2000.
The International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission (IGLHRC) has learned that the Egyptian government has decided to retry 50 of the defendants in the "Cairo 52" case.
An Egyptian appeals court in Damanhour, found the "Damanhour Five" not-guilty of all charges. The five men had been convicted in March 2002 of consensual homosexual conduct, and had been sentenced to 3 years' imprisonment and 3 years' probation.
Two years ago, women were granted the right to instigate unilateral khul' divorce. It was supposed to change the face of Egyptian family life. However the results, Mariz Tadros discovers, have confounded all predictions.
During the past 12 months, a massive police crackdown against homosexual men has terrified the country’s gay community and raised a chorus of criticism from human rights groups in Europe and America.
On February 3, 2002, a court in Boulak-al-Dakrour (in Giza, a suburb of Cairo) convicted four men for consensual homosexual behavior.
Charles Josselin recevra au nom du gouvernement français, dans le cadre du NEPAD (Nouveau partenariat pour le développement de l’Afrique), des chefs d’état et de gouvernement étrangers.
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