Address: P.O. Box 12629, Addis Ababa

Tel: (+251)-11-618 32 82; (+251)-11-662 45 02

Contact: Ms. Bogalech Alemu, Chairperson

The authors test the unitary versus collective model of the household using specially designed data from Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Indonesia, and South Africa. Human capital and individual assets at the time of marriage are used as proxy measures for bargaining power. In all four countries, we reject the unitary model as a description of household behaviour, but fail to reject the hypothesis that households are Pareto-efficient. In Bangladesh and South Africa, women's assets increase expenditure shares on education, while in Ethiopia it is men's assets that have this effect.
This desk study provides an analysis of the constraints and discrimination that women face with respect to access to rural land with the hope of informing future policy and civil society interventions. The country studies investigate statutory and customary discriminations, and they attempt to place the theme of women’s access to land into a larger socio-cultural frame of reference.

A reference material on FGM and the legal provisions under the Ethiopian Law. It also takes a general look at Women’s through a constitutional perspective. 

An information material on the types of FGM practised in Ethiopia, its prevalence and severe forms found among both Ethiopian and Somali societies.

Nous représentantes de diverses organisations de la Société Civile Africaine réunies au Forum Mondial pour la Revue de Beijing 15 ans après et représentant les voix des millions de femmes et jeunes filles Africaines, Apres avoir eu des consultations avec différents acteurs avant et pendant le Forum Mondial des ONG sur les progrès enregistrés dans la mise en œuvre de le Déclaration et la Plate Forme d’Action de Beijing en Afrique,

29 March to 27 April 2010 (Global): The witchcraft epidemic in Africa is fueled by religious extremism. Practitioners of traditional African religions, traditional healers, witch-doctors and Christian missionaries and religious leaders incite witch-hunts on this continent. There are comparisons to be made between Africas current witch-craze, European Inquisitions and American witch-hunts. Perhaps the lessons to be learned in Africa are the same as those that needed to be learned by Europeans and Americans; there is no culture without human rights. All men and women, including Witches, have the right to live without being falsely accused, assaulted, persecuted or murdered.

An Inter-African Committee film about early marriage in Ethiopia focuses on the harmful effects of this traditional practice.
Acid attacks are almost unheard of in Ethiopia although the tactic has been used against women in other countries. Although Kamilat was attacked in January, she and her family are now public with their story in order to raise support and awareness.
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