Women Human Rights Defenders

This report reflects the situation of Sudanese Women Human Rights Defenders during the period from 2009-2012. It highlights the main challenges facing WHRDs in Sudan, and documents the escalating violations against them by state and non-state actors. The work of Sudanese WHRDs in the period covered in this report is the most risky and affected by the fundamental changes which took place during the last 3 years.

Tehran’s Prosecutor has stopped all in-person visits in the women’s section of Evin Prison, according to opposition websites.

Women Living Under Muslim Laws (WLUML) strongly condemns the attempted assassination on school girl and activist, Malala Yousufzai for promoting female education.  Spirited and outspoken, Malala has been an advocate for girls’ access to education in her region from the age of 11 “dreaming of a day where education prevails”.

Malala Yousafzai was attacked on her way home from school in Mingora, the region's main town.Nominated for an international peace award, she came to public attention in 2009 by writing a diary for BBC Urdu about life under the Taliban.

Gulalai Ismail, jeune femme de 25 ans défenseure des droits humains (FDDH) et Présidente de Aware Girls[1] travaille depuis de nombreuses années pour améliorer la condition des jeunes femmes au Pakistan. Gulalai s'entretient avec l’AWID et nous fait part de ses expériences comme jeune FDDH vivant dans un contexte d'oppression et de discrimination sous le prétexte de raisons culturelles et religieuses.

This report aims to illustrate the ways in which the repressive policies of the past, especially those geared towards women human rights defenders (WHRDs) are still with us. Not only does this report illustrate the ways in which violations against WHRDs persist, but it also underlines the fact that the repressive practices undertaken by the state against WHRDs are escalating, especially under militarism. 

During the protests against the Sudanese government austerity measures which started in June and while 12 women had been detained During the protests against the Sudanese government austerity measures which  started in June and incommunicado for 6-8 weeks for most of them. The Sudanese government released most of the detainees arrested during the 2 months protests on August 17-20, at least 200 detainees  had been released among them the 12 women. 

Women activists challenging the fundamental structures of their communities and calling for new terms of peaceful coexistence between the Sudanese people, are facing prosecution, sexual violence, and harsh punishment by Sudan's security service, says Nazik Kabalo

This submission to the Commission on the Status of Women (the Commission) is intended to draw the Commission’s attention to the continuing pattern of human rights violations experienced by women in Iran in reprisal for their peaceful human rights or political activities on account of their ethnic origin, their faith, the peaceful exercise of their rights to freedom of expression and association, or their relationship to men who have expressed views dissenting from those considered acceptable by the Iranian authorities.

Farida Afridi was shot dead in cold blood for the crime of being a decent, caring human being. As the executive director of the human rights NGO, Sawera, Afridi was working in Fata performing the most thankless of jobs: trying to improve the plight of women in an area where many people have never even considered the concept of women’s rights. For that, she had to pay the ultimate price as she was killed by armed gunmen, most likely members of the Taliban, as she drove from her home in Hayatabad, Peshawar to Jamrud in Khyber Agency. Apart from taking away a valuable activist, the militants, through their brutality, will also ensure that there is a chilling effect as fewer NGOs and women will be willing to risk working in an area that needs their efforts the most.

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