Pakistan

Religion and politics make for a very lethal combination, not just for others but also for the very society in which this occurs.
The Pakistan government bulldozed the Criminal Law (Amendment) Bill 2004 against “honour killings” in the National Assembly and adopted it on 26 October 2004 without any debate amidst opposition walkout.
Murder by any other name still smells foul. It is still murder.
The Human Rights Commission of Pakistan condemned the kidnapping of two French journalists by terrorists in Iraq and urged Muslim women to raise their voice against such attacks.
City dwellers now enjoy new freedoms, but in rural areas old rules still apply.
The Commission on the Status of Women had reviewed the Citizenship Act, and recommended that the language should be changed from being exclusively male.
Twenty-five years back, in the process of Islamization of the society, Hudood Laws were promulgated in Pakistan by the military ruler Gen. Zia ul Haq and Islamic Shariah was imposed by enforcing Islamic punishments in the form of "Hadd."
Human Rights Commission of Pakistan fact finding mission.
The Pakistan government's move to abolish five percent reservation for women in government jobs has evoked sharp criticism from activists and the opposition, which, recently introduced a bill demanding an increase in job reservations for them.
The National Commission on the Status of Women (NCSW), after reviewing the Qisas and Diyat Ordinance (Act II of 1997) and the concept of justice in Islam, declared that honour killings and all other sorts of victimisation of women have no link with Islam.
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