Sri Lanka

ALLANKULAM, 8 September 2011 (IRIN) - More policies and programmes must address the needs of female-headed households in Sri Lanka's former conflict zone, experts say. 

"Most programmes don't take into account the unique role of women here," Saroja Sivachandran, director of the Center for Women and Development (CWD), an advocacy body based in northern Jaffna, told IRIN. 

"They may be providing for the families, but [women] still have to cook, look after children and do all household chores." 

MWRAF strives to empower women to realize their full potential, locating itself in the local as well as the larger socio-political context, challenging given ‘codes and norms’, while addressing emerging issues that directly affect people’s lives. It seeks equity and justice for all women in a society free of violence against women and exploitation of women by all patriarchal structures including the family, society, custom, religion, and the state.

ICES is a renowned international research centre located in Sri Lanka. It is amongst the select few institutions that are both ‘local’ to the global South and ‘international’ in orientation. ICES is in ‘special category’ consultative status with the United Nations ECOSOC. The mission of ICES is “to deepen the understanding of ethnicity, identity politics and conflict, and to foster conditions for an inclusive, just and peaceful society nationally, regionally and globally, through research, publication, dialogue, creative expression and knowledge transfer”.

The study reviews the formal and customary laws and practices governing the rights of women to inherit land in six South Asian countries (Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka). The study includes an analysis of existing laws and customs and their impact on inheritance and land rights in all six countries. It also provides recommendations for how to design interventions that can attempt to improve women’s inheritance rights.

This is a feminist economist analysis of female headed households in Sri Lanka’s Eastern Province. The author challenges the dominant discourses that Sri Lankan women have achieved a favorable position in society compared to many women living elsewhere because they have achieved high scores in human development indices and other global indices as well as the fact that Sri Lankan women can own and inherit property through matrilineal and bilateral inheritance patterns.

Critiquing Discriminatory Laws, Regulations and Administrative Practices relating to Land and Property Rights of Women in Sri Lanka, Colombo, Law and Society Trust. This is a review of national and provincial laws, regulations and administrative practices in Sri Lanka relating to women’s land and property ownership. This study attempts to understand practical situations and problems experienced by women. The aim of the review is to formulate amendments to reform gender discriminatory aspects in laws relating to land and property ownership.

This paper describes and analyses the pattern of descent, marriage and household organization shared by Muslims and Tamils in the town of Akkaraipattu in the matrilineal belt of Sri Lanka, the Tamil-speaking, eastern coastal region.
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