Africa

The thesis tries to explain the Practice of FGM in the context of culture and how it is used to control female sexuality. It brings out belief systems and how the victims of FGM are indoctrinated to embrace patriarchal values etc. 

This article gives detailed information about Female Genital Mutilation and women’s sexuality; it outlines the practice of FGM in Africa and amongst minorities in Asia. It also talks about the state’s obligation to protect children and observe human rights standards, as well as calling for cultural tolerance and acceptance of social diversity.

The author shows that female circumcision is not confined to the Horn of Africa, or the Muslim areas of the continent. Her study of the practice in Sierra Leone demonstrates its important role in the traditional initiation of females into both womanhood and society in parts of West Africa. The material sets out detailed and practical proposals for a 20 year programme to end “the crippling of women by this operation”.

This monograph describes Nigeria’s social structure, the basis and nature of Nigeria’s harmful traditional practices, and problems faced by women both in the context of female genital mutilation and patriarchy.

This articlelooks at customs, rituals, myths, and taboos that have perpetuated the practice of FGM. It also harps on the disastrous health effects of FGM, combined with the social injustices that it perpetuates, and the contributing barrier to overall African development.

This book discusses the definition and types of FGM and explores the common justifications for the practice, along with rates of incidence in Africa and other continents, global laws, legal issues, rights and religion. Ethical considerations are examined, as are progress and the role of culture. The book concludes with thoughts on the movement from tradition to cultural evolution.

It is estimated that some 140 million women, girls and babies throughout the world have been genitally mutilated. Another three million girls are at risk of such mutilation each year. Female genital mutilation is primarily practised in 28 African countries, the incidence varying markedly within various regions and countries according to ethnic affiliation. National rates of prevalence vary from 1 to 98 percent. The practice is also transported to Europe, America and else-where as a result of migration.

This is a material on the reclassification of FGM: the Local to Global Nature of the practice. It looks at the misunderstanding, confusion, and controversy over the complex dimensions of FGM that remain unresolved.

This report deals with law reform processes in legislating FGM. It gives background information on the types of laws in some African countries, including those without specific laws against FGM. 

This project was implemented by Human Angle, an organisation that has been working in Nigeria to protect the right of widows to inherit their deceased husbands’ estate, without being dispossessed by their in-laws. Human Angle uses the following ways to achieve this aim:

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