Iraq: Protect Iraqi women's rights in the new Iraq Constitution

Women Living Under Muslim Laws (WLUML) strongly urges you to support Iraqi women's demands for a constitution that secures the rights and liberties of all Iraqi people and especially of Iraqi women.
Source: 
WLUML
Action needed: 

The Iraqi women’s movement, composed of the Iraqi Women’s Network and the Women’s Leadership Institute, will gather on Tuesday 9 August at 14.00 on Alfordous Square in Baghdad to demonstrate their resistance to the erosion of their rights. They have invited all women’s groups in Iraq, political parties and civil society organizations to join them.

1) Please send messages of support and solidarity in time for this event. This is a major opportunity to strengthen the visibility of Iraqi women’s resistance to the erosion of their rights. Messages can be sent by e-mail directly to the organizers of this event:

The Women’s Leadership Institute: wliiraq@yahoo.com
The Iraqi Women’s Network: iraqiwomennet@yahoo.com

A copy of the Letter of Support sent by WLUML follows below.

2) We also urge you to send a message to the Iraqi authorities, insisting they listen to women’s voices and adhere to international law regarding women’s rights.

A copy of the message sent by WLUML to the Iraqi Authorities follows below.

SAMPLE LETTERS

For Friends in the Iraqi Women’s Movement

Dear Friends,

The international solidarity network Women Living Under Muslim Laws wishes to express its fullest solidarity with the women of Iraq in their struggle to ensure their rights in the future Iraqi constitution and to resist against any retreat from the gains they have achieved over the past decades.

WLUML links women in over 70 Muslim countries and communities, linking women in majority and minority contexts, in states where laws are framed with reference to Islam and in secular states, and crossing boundaries of geography, language, ethnicity and other identities. Despite our diversities, we share the commonality that all too often our oppression as women is justified with reference to Islam, and that extreme right forces seek to manipulate religion to gain political and social power.

The women linked through our network have already had a bitter experience of the trampling of women’s human rights in the name of Islam through regressive changes to family and criminal laws and the introduction of discriminatory policies since the rise of fundamentalist groups in the 1980s.

WLUML shares your concern that making equal rights for women conditional upon something so vaguely defined as ‘the principles of Shariah’ will create huge problems for women particularly in family laws. Conflicts around which forms or interpretations of Muslim laws should apply will affect all groups who lack social and political power, including women.

In all Muslim countries and communities there has been a history of resistance to the imposition of a homogenous, authoritarian vision of society, such as that promoted by extreme-right politico-religious groups. Progressive scholars have consistently challenged traditional patriarchal monopolies over the interpretation of Islam, while women’s and progressive human rights activists have insisted that human rights and social justice form the basis for local social development. Where democratic expression has been allowed to develop, the people in Muslim countries and communities have rejected the fundamentalists’ project. In places where there has been less space for democratic expression women and progressive men have forced the opening of debate and had a measure of success in protecting the spaces for alternative voices.

WLUML wishes to applaud the struggle of Iraqi women to ensure their rights in the future Iraqi constitution and wishes them success in their struggle to prevent any retreat from the gains they have made in past decades.

In solidarity

WLUML


For the Chair of the Constitutional Drafting Committee

For Mr. Hamam Hamoudi
Chair of the Constitutional Drafting Committee

We are writing to express our deepest concern regarding the drafts of the Iraqi future constitution released by the Constitutional Committee and its implication for women’s right in Iraq. We strongly urge you to address the concerns raised by Iraqi women's groups and to use your authority to protect Iraqi women’s rights and to oppose the passing of any proposal that ignores or diminishes women’s rights.

Iraqi women’s groups have expressed particular concern regarding the draft chapter on Duties & Rights, in which the ‘principles of Shariah’ have been stated as the main source of legislation. Drafts also acknowledge the equal rights of women with men in all fields, but on condition that this does not contradict with the ‘principles of Shariah’.

Another major concern is the article that requires court cases dealing with personal status matters (such as marriage, divorce, inheritance, etc..) to be judged according to the law practiced by the person’s sect or religion.

Women’s groups in Iraq are worried that this decision threatens the 1959 Iraqi Law of Personal Status, which has long been considered one of the most progressive family laws in the Middle East.

We strongly agree with the analysis of Iraqi women’s group that the concerned articles will have negative effects on Iraqi society and will mean withdrawing rights that have been guaranteed to Iraqi women for many decades. Inequality in the family obstructs national development.

Furthermore, in WLUML’s experience, conditioning equal rights for women on such sweeping and undefined grounds will create huge problems for women, particularly obstructing their rights within the family.

It is also WLUML’s experience that making religious principles the main source of law only leads to endless conflicts around which form or interpretation of Muslim laws should apply.

Any proposal to replace Iraq's Personal Status Law for Muslims with ‘Shariah as interpreted by each sect’ will threaten the fabric of Iraqi society. It will establish sectarianism as an organizing principle of social and political life in Iraq, and will deeply damage the cause of national integration. Moreover, it will introduce legal chaos, as there are differences even within the various sects regarding interpretations of Muslim laws.

We share Iraqi women’s concerns that the draft suggests to drop or phase out a measure enshrined in the interim constitution requiring that women make up at least a quarter of parliament.

The proposed constitution is a major retreat from the gains achieved by Iraqi women in past decades, this includes a threatened regression from international treaties already signed or ratified by Iraq.

We urge you to use your authority as the chairman of the Constitutional Drafting Committee to protect Iraqi women’s rights and to oppose the passing of any proposal that ignores or diminishes women’s rights.

Thank you for your attention to this important issue.

Yours sincerely...

Addresses: 

Please send your letters to:

Mr. Hamam Hamoudi
Chairman of the Constitutional Drafting Committee, Iraq
Email: dostorna@yahoo.com

Mr. Jalal Talabani
President, Iraq
Email: presidentialprotocol.iraq@gmail.com

Mr. Ibrahim al-Jaafari
Prime Minister, Iraq
Email: dostorna@yahoo.com

Mr. Hajim al-Hassani
Head of the National Assembly, Iraq
Email: dostorna@yahoo.com

Please send a copy of your letters to:

Women’s Leadership Institute: wliiraq@yahoo.com
Iraqi Women’s Network: iraqiwomennet@yahoo.com
Women Living Under Muslim Laws (WLUML): wluml@wluml.org

UPDATE: Bahrain: The main case against Ghada Jamsheer has been dismissed

WLUML has learned that the main case against women's rights activist Ghada Jamsheer has been dropped on the grounds that it was illegally brought against her by the Public Prosecution.

Bahrain: Take action in support of Ghada Jamsheer and defenders of human and women’s rights

WLUML has received an urgent request from The Bahrain Centre for Human Rights (BCHR) calling for support for women’s rights campaigner Ms. Ghada Jamsheer.
Action needed: 
Send urgent letters to the Bahraini authorities demanding that:
  1. They drop all charges against Ms. Jamsheer.
  2. The government stops putting pressure on all of those who call for the protection of women’s rights and human rights. Such pressure must not be used as an excuse to silence progressive voices and those who seek to reveal the realities of women’s status in Bahrain.
  3. The government addresses the concerns of CWP in relation to family laws in Bahrain, and responds to CWP demands for the codification of family laws and the reform of Shari’a Family Courts.
  4. The government should amend the laws which criminalize and suppress public criticism and opinion.
A sample letter and addresses of officials to be contacted follow below.

Sample letter

Your Excellency/ Your Majesty/ Sir…

We are writing to express our deep concern about the three criminal charges made against women's rights campaigner Ms. Ghada Yusuf Jamsheer, the head of the Committee of Women's Petition Committee (WPC), accusing her of foul language, abusing a shari'a family court and a former shari'a judge.

We believe that the concerns voiced by Ms. Jamsheer and by the CWP regarding family laws in Bahrain should be debated within the community and addressed by the Bahraini government. We are confident that any opinions expressed were in the spirit of constructive dialogue with the aim of enhancing the principles of democracy, equality and justice in Bahrain.

The legal action against Ms. Jamsheer is a reversal of the positive political and constitutional reforms currently taking place in Bahrain, and is an attempt to prevent the establishment of political, social and civil rights for Bahraini women.

We are concerned that the legal action against Ms. Jamsheer will silence women’s voices and discourage their participation in the debate around family laws in Bahrain. This will weaken the women’s reform movement and also put psychological and legal pressure on all people who call for the protection of women’s rights, human rights and freedom of expression. The legal actions against Ms. Jamsheer are violations of the freedom of expression and will prevent much needed debates in Bahraini society. They are also obstacles to the contribution of women towards the building of a better society.

We are confident that you will use your authority to recognize and support women’s participation in a public debate about issues which affect all Bahraini citizens. We therefore urge you to use your authority to have the case against her withdrawn immediately. We also urge you to amend laws which criminalize and suppress public criticism and opinions.

We further urge you to address the concerns of CWP in relation to family laws in Bahrain, and accept demands for the reform of Shari’a Family Courts and the codification of family law based on principles of equality and justice for all Bahraini citizens.

Thank you for your attention to this important issue.

Yours sincerely,
Addresses: 
ADDRESS YOUR LETTERS TO

The Embassy of Bahrain in your country
http://www.helplinedatabase.com/embassy-database/country-in-other-countries/bahrain.html

The Royal Council
His Majesty the King, Sheikh Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa, King of Bahrain
Fax: +973-17664587

Crown Prince Council
Sheikh Salman bin Hamad bin Isa Al-Khalifa, Crown Prince of Bahrain
Fax: +973-17664587

Vice-President of the Supreme Council for Justice
Sheikh Khalifa Rashed Al-Khalifa
Fax: +973-17535852

Minister of Justice
Mr. Mohammed Ali Al Sitri
Fax: +973-17531284

The Head of the Council of Ministers
His Highness Sheikh Khalifa Bin Salman Al Khalifa
Fax: +973-17211363

Please send copies of your letters/messages to wluml@wluml.org

UPDATE: Canada: Support Canadian women's struggle against Shari'a Courts

The undersigned Canadian associations call for support in their struggle against the introduction of religious arbitration courts for family matters in Canada.
Action needed: 
Send your letters and messages of support to:

hogben@kingston.net
abrunet@dd-rd.ca
bonnie@nawl.ca

UPDATE: Turkey: Muyeser Gunes and members of Mothers for Peace are free

Thanks to international pressure, solidarity and support, Muyeser Gunes and the members of Mothers for Peace have been released.
Source: 
Women in Black

Turkey: Demand the release of members of the Peace Caravan

WLUML has received a call for action from friends in Women in Black Leuven (Belgium) to demand the immediate release of Muyeser Gunes of the association Mothers for Peace and of the other members of the Peace Caravan held in Turkish prisons awaiting trial.
Source: 
Women in Black
Headline URL: 
http://snellings.telenet.be/womeninblackleuven/muyeser_gunes_english.htm

Turkey: Action alert to eliminate gender discrimination and human rights violations in the new Turkish Penal Code

WLUML has received a call for action from friends in Turkey following the recent Turkish Penal Code reform and urges you to respond.
Source: 
Women for Women's Human Rights - New Ways
Action needed: 
We request you to write to the Turkish authorities based on the letter below. The relevant addresses are given below.

Sample Letter

Dear ....

We are deeply concerned that the Turkish Parliament has refused to see through its commitment to realize gender equality and eradicate human rights violations with the recent Turkish Penal Code reform. As it stands, the new Penal Code still falls short of responding to women’s demands and ascertaining full gender equality. The new law continues to legitimize human rights violations, and thus fails to comply with the constitutional principle of gender equality and global human rights norms.

It is a crucial opportunity that the enactment of the new Penal Code is postponed to June 1st, 2005 and is going under further review. We call upon you and the members of the parliament to make use of this opportunity to take a step further in ensuring gender equality and affirming Turkey’s commitment to protecting the freedom and rights of its citizens fully as an egalitarian and democratic state of law. To this end, we strongly urge you to take the following measures concerning amendments to the new Turkish Penal Code:
  • To replace "killings in the name of customary law" with "honor killings" as an aggravating circumstance for homicides in order to prevent honor killing perpetrators from receiving sentence reductions in all cases;
  • To explicitly and effectively ban and criminalize virginity testing in all cases and to penalize all kinds of genital examination performed without the necessary legal authorization or against the woman’s consent;
  • To penalize "discrimination based on sexual orientation" which was removed later, and to amend the article to effectively penalize any violation of political, sexual and economic rights based on discrimination;
  • To re-extend the abortion period up to 12 weeks instead of 10 weeks as was initially stated in the original Draft Law;
  • To remove the article penalizing consensual sexual relations between young people of 15 – 18 years of age;
  • To amend the "obscenity" article by clearly defining acts of "obscenity" in order to prevent threat to freedom of expression, invasion of privacy and discrimination based on sexual orientation.

We strongly urge you to take the necessary action to establish the amendment of these discriminatory provisions in the Turkish Penal Code Draft Law.

Sincerely yours,
Addresses: 
Addresses

Mr. Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Prime Minister, Republic of Turkey
Fax: +90 312 417 0476 Email: erdogan@basbakanlik.gov.tr or tayyiperdogan@rterdogan.com

Mr. Cemil Cicek, Minister of Justice, Republic of Turkey
Fax: +90 312 417 71 13

Mr. Abdullah Gül, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Republic of Turkey
Fax: +90 312 419 16 32
Email: abdullah.gul@basbakanlik.gov.tr

Mr. Deniz Baykal, Republican People's Party
Fax: +90 312 468 09 96

UPDATE: Bangladesh: The situation of the Ahmadiyya (Qadiani) community is deteriorating rapidly

WLUML again urges you to respond with increased pressure on the Bangladesh Government regarding their duty to protect minority communities.
Action needed: 

The persecution of Ahmadiyya (Qadiani) groups and other minorities has been frequently used by governments as a means of diverting attention away from real political and economic problems facing the people. Extreme Right politico-religious groups have also raised questions regarding the status of the Ahmadiyya (Qadiani) community as a means of monopolising local politics and of pressurising governments.

Addresses: 
Please URGENTLY take the following action:

1. Contact any Ahmadiyya groups in your area to offer solidarity.

2. Write to your Foreign Ministry requesting them to uphold international commitments to religious freedom and freedom of expression.

3. Write to the Government of Bangladesh urging it to take immediate steps to ensure the right to religious freedom and freedom of expression of the Ahmadiyya community.

Begum Khaleda Zia
Hon'ble Prime Minister
Government of the People's Republic of Bangladesh
Prime Minister's Office, Old Sangsad Bhaban, Tejgaon, Dhaka
Phone : (880 2) 8828160 - 79, 9888677; Fax: (880 2) 8113244 (Principal Secretary)
Fax: (880 2) 9133722 (Political Sec.); (880 2) 8113243 (Press Sec.)
Email: pmo@pmo.bdonline.com

Mr. Altaf Hossain Choudhury
Hon'ble Minister, Ministry of Home Affairs
Government of the People's Republic of Bangladesh
Bangladesh Secretariat (Building No. 8), Dhaka
Phone (880 2) 7164611; 8614611 and 8614633
Fax: (880 2) 8619667; and 8614788

Mr. Mosharef Hossain Shajahan
Hon'ble State Minister, Ministry of Religious Affairs
Government of the People's Republic of Bangladesh
Bangladesh Secretariat, Dhaka
Phone (880 2) 8610682
Fax: (880 2) 8615040

Canada: Support Canadian women's struggle against Shari'a Courts

WLUML asks you URGENTLY to send letters of support to Canadian women’s organisations, in particular organisations of women whose families come from Muslim societies, in their struggle to resist the introduction of so-called ‘Shari’a Courts’ in the resolution of family matters in Canada.
Action needed: 
The Canadian Council of Muslim Women is holding a Symposium Muslim Women in the Justice System: Gender, Religion and Pluralism on Saturday 9 April 2005, in Toronto.

Please send messages of support and solidarity in time for this event and the expected national publicity surrounding it.

If you are not able to meet this deadline, please nevertheless send your messages as we need to ensure sustained pressure until the government takes positive steps to address the issue.

A copy of the Letter of Support sent by WLUML follows below. It highlights some of the points to be raised. We suggest you add specific detail regarding women’s experiences of fundamentalism in your own context.

To reflect women’s global concern with this development, we also urge you have your message of support signed or endorsed by as many women’s and human rights groups in your country as possible.

We also urge you to send a message to the Canadian authorities, insisting they listen to all women’s voices and follow international law on discrimination. A copy of the message sent by WLUML to the Canadian authorities is below.

WLUML Letter of Solidarity to the Women of Canada

The international solidarity network Women Living Under Muslim Laws wishes to express its solidarity with the women of Canada, in particular those migrants whose families come from Muslim societies, in their struggle to resist the introduction of so-called ‘Shari’a Courts’ in the resolution of family matters in Canada.

WLUML links women in over 70 Muslim countries and communities, linking women in majority and minority contexts, in states where laws are framed with reference to Islam and in secular states, and crossing boundaries of geography, language, ethnicity and other identities.

Despite our diversities, we share the commonality that all too often our oppression as women is justified with reference to Islam, and that extreme right forces seek to manipulate religion to gain political and social power.

In all Muslim countries and communities there has been a history of resistance to the imposition of a homogenous, authoritarian vision of society, such as that promoted by fundamentalist groups. Progressive scholars have consistently challenged traditional patriarchal monopolies over the interpretation of Islam, while women’s and progressive human rights activists have insisted that human rights and social justice form the basis for local social development. Where democratic expression has been allowed to develop, the people in Muslim countries and communities have rejected the fundamentalists’ project, while even in undemocratic countries women and progressive men have forced the opening of debate and had a measure of success in protecting the spaces for alternative voices.

This victory has led the extreme right from Muslim contexts to launch a new strategy, opening up a new front in Europe and North America. In the name of ‘freedom of expression’ and anti-racism – the very values we stand for – and under the disguise of defending ‘community rights’, fundamentalist groups have increasingly succeeded in entering progressive circles here, which continue to take cultural relativist positions.

This Unholy Alliance between some progressives and the fundamentalists has then sought to take advantage of state policies of multiculturalism and the painful realities of continuing racial discrimination to demand special rights for the ‘Muslim community’. But these special rights inevitably involve anti-women practices and highly regressive interpretations of Islam. They also unquestioningly presume that all migrants from Muslim contexts identify as ‘Muslim’.

The women linked through our network have already had a bitter experience of the trampling of women’s human rights in the name of Islam through regressive changes to family and criminal laws and the introduction of discriminatory policies since the rise of fundamentalist groups in the 1980s. Constitutional guarantees of equality have not been sufficient to protect women from the effect of such changes nor from the anti-women social atmosphere that they have encouraged.

Indeed, family and community pressure can severely limit a woman's right to exercise ‘choice’ regarding for example which legal fora she approaches for her claim. Provisions which apparently offer a range of legal options can in reality force women to have to ‘choose’ one aspect of their multiple identities at the cost of another.

This often jeopardises women's autonomy, as already demonstrated in other migrant communities, such as in France and the UK. This is particularly true given that women’s voices on community issues are given less legitimacy than men’s voices.

We are also keenly aware that any victory for conservative forces among Muslim communities in Europe and North America will in this globalised world automatically reinforce fundamentalist groups in Muslim countries and communities elsewhere. This will lead to a backlash against us in contexts where we have had a measure of success in preserving the space for women’s and alternative voices. In addition to our sense of solidarity, it is fear of such a development that leads WLUML to express our support for women in migrant Muslim communities in Canada and elsewhere.

We recognise that migrant communities and Muslims face an atmosphere of growing prejudice, discrimination and exclusion in Europe and North America, particularly in the context of the ‘war on terror’.

But giving power and legitimacy to extreme right political movements, such as fundamentalists within Muslim communities, is neither an acceptable nor effective way of addressing such problems. The complex notion of identity cannot be left to right-wing male community leaders to define.

Obscurantist men cannot legitimately claim to ‘speak for’ these communities which are as politically and socially diverse as the majority community. If the majority community expects its issues to be resolved through democratic and pluralist processes, and be addressed as citizens rather than members of any congregation, why should these processes be denied to those from a migrant Muslim background?

It is vital that the voices of women and progressive men from migrant Muslim backgrounds are recognised - by progressive social movements in Europe and North America as well as by the state in these contexts. Progressives seek to address the problems facing their societies in ways that ensure the rights of all are respected and implemented.

We also urge women in migrant Muslim communities to link with women’s and progressive struggles in other Muslim contexts, and to recognise the victories gained by these struggles. It would be ironic if women in other Muslim contexts find themselves with greater rights than their sisters in migrant contexts who have accepted a curtailment of their rights on the pretext of ‘defending Islam’ or the community in the face of discrimination.

WLUML wishes to applaud the on-going struggle of Canadian women to ensure an end to all forms of discrimination. It celebrates the unity of women’s struggles, and extends its fullest support to the efforts of women from migrant Muslim communities to resist all efforts to further exclude them from their rights.
Addresses: 
Canadian Women’s Groups

Canadian Council of Muslim Women
P.O. Box 154, GANANOQUE, ONT K7G 2T7
Email: info@ccmw.com
Website: www.ccmw.com

National Association of Women and the Law (NAWL)
Andrée Côté, Director, Legislation and Law Reform
National Association of Women and the Law
1066 Somerset West, suite 303, Ottawa K1Y 4T3
Tel: +1 613 241-7570, ext. 25
Fax: +1 613 241-4657
Email: andree@nawl.ca

Legal Action and Education Fund (LEAF), National Legal Committee Subcommittee on the family law/arbitration issue
Cindy Wilkey
Email: wilkeyc@lao.on.ca

National Organization of Immigrant and Visible Minority Women of Canada (NOVMWC)
Anu Bose, Executive Director NOIVMWC, Ottawa
Email: anubose@noivmwc.org

Muslim Canadian Congress
Tel: +1 416 928-0477
Email: muslimchronicle@canada.com

International Campaign Against Shari'a Court in Canada
Homa Arjomand
Tel: +1 416 737-9500
Email: noShariacourt@yahoo.com

WLUML Letter to the Canadian Authorities

The international solidarity network Women Living Under Muslim Laws urges the Canadian government and the authorities of Ontario and other provinces to listen to the voices of the women of Canada, in particular those migrants whose families come from Muslim societies, who are resisting the use of the 1991 Arbitration Act to introduce so-called ‘Shari’a Courts’ in the resolution of family matters.

WLUML links women in over 70 Muslim countries and communities, linking women in majority and minority contexts, in states where laws are framed with reference to Islam and in secular states, and crossing boundaries of geography, language, ethnicity and other identities.

Despite our diversities, we share the commonality that all too often our oppression as women is justified with reference to Islam, and that extreme right forces seek to manipulate religion to gain political and social power.

In the name of ‘freedom of expression’ and anti-racism – the very values we stand for – and under the disguise of defending ‘community rights’ in face of the painful realities of continuing racial discrimination, fundamentalist groups and their cultural relativist allies on the left are demanding special rights for the ‘Muslim community’. But these special rights inevitably involve anti-women practices and highly regressive interpretations of Islam. They also unquestioningly presume that all migrants from Muslim contexts identify as ‘Muslim’.

In the bitter experience of the women linked through our network, constitutional guarantees of equality have not been sufficient to protect women from the effects of the ‘Islamisation’ of laws nor from the anti-women social atmosphere that they have encouraged since the rise of fundamentalist groups in the 1980s.

Indeed, family and community pressure can severely limit a woman's right to exercise ‘choice’ regarding for example which legal fora she approaches for her claim. Provisions which apparently offer a range of legal options can in reality force women to have to ‘choose’ one aspect of their multiple identities at the cost of another. This often jeopardises women's autonomy, as already demonstrated in other migrant communities, such as in France and the UK.

This is particularly true given that multiculturalist policies often give women’s voices on community issues less legitimacy than men’s voices. Obscurantist men cannot legitimately claim to ‘speak for’ these communities which are as politically and socially diverse as the majority community. If the majority community expects its issues to be resolved through democratic and pluralist processes, and be addressed as citizens rather than members of any congregation, why should these processes be denied to those from a migrant Muslim background?

The UN Human Rights Committee in General Comment No. 28 has said that: “States parties should ensure that traditional, historical, religious or cultural attitudes are not used to justify violations of women's right to equality before the law and to equal enjoyment of all Covenant [on Civil and Political Rights] rights.”

WLUML therefore urges the Canadian authorities to listen to the concerns expressed by women and to follow international human rights law on this matter.

Yours sincerely
Women Living Under Muslim Laws
International Coordination Office

Canadian National Authorities

Prime Minister
The Right Honourable Paul Martin
80 Wellington St. Ottawa
Ontario, Canada K1A OA2
Fax: +1 613-941-6900
Email: pm@pm.gc.ca or martin.p@parl.gc.ca

Justice Minister and Attorney General of Canada
The Honourable Irwin Cotler
House of Commons
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0A6
Fax: +1 613 992-6762
Email: Cotler.I@parl.gc.ca

Minister responsible for Status of Women
The Honourable Liza Frulla
House of Commons
Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0A6
Fax: +1 613 995-6404
Email: Frulla.L@parl.gc.ca

Minister of State (Multiculturalism)
The Honourable Raymond Chan
House of Commons
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0A6
Fax: (613) 995-2174
Email: Chan.R@parl.gc.ca

Canadian embassies/High Commissions

This website has information for Canadian embassies, consulates and high commissions abroad: http://www.dfait-maeci.gc.ca/world/embassies/cra-en.asp

Provincial Authorities

Premier of Ontario
The Honourable Dalton McGuinty
Ministry of Intergovernmental Affairs
900 Bay St, 6th Flr, Mowat Block
Toronto ON M7A 1C2
Tel: +1 416-325-9895
Fax: +1 416-325-5222
Email: dmcguinty.mpp.co@liberal.ola.org

Attorney General
The Honourable Michael Bryant
Ministry of the Attorney General
720 Bay St, 11th Flr
Toronto ON M5G 2K1
Fax : +1 416-326-4016
Email: michael.bryant@jus.gov.on.ca

Minister Responsible for Women's Issues
The Honourable Sandra Pupatello
80 Grosvenor St, 6th Flr, Hepburn Block
Toronto ON M7A 1E9
Fax : +1 416-325-5221
Email: spupatello.mpp@liberal.ola.org

United Nations Special Rapporteurs

Special Rapporteur on Violence against Women
Ms. Yakin Ertürk
OHCHR-UNOG
8-14 Avenue de la Paix
1211 Geneva 10
Switzerland
Fax: +41 22 917 9006
Email: urgent-action@ohchr.org

Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Migrants
Ms. Gabriela Rodríguez Pizarro
OHCHR-UNOG
8-14 Avenue de la Paix
1211 Geneva 10
Switzerland
Fax: +41 22 917 9006
Email: urgent-action@ohchr.org

Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion
Asma Jahangir
OHCHR-UNOG
8-14 Avenue de la Paix
1211 Geneva 10
Switzerland
Fax: +41 22 917 9006
Email: urgent-action@ohchr.org

please Cc your messages to WLUML: wluml@wluml.org

UPDATE - Iraq: Giuliana Sgrena has been released

WLUML is relieved to learn of the release of Giuliana Sgrena but concerned about reports that her car was fired on by US forces leaving her injured and a negotiator dead.
Source: 
The Guardian
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