Sexuality

 13/07/2015

Les deux Marocaines arrêtées en juin pour port de tenues jugées trop légères ont été innocentées lundi par un tribunal d'Agadir. Poursuivies pour "outrage à la pudeur", elles encouraient de un mois à deux ans de prison.

By Hikma Ahmed, ACAL

Saadia Rajab is a 22 year old Sudanese woman who was charged with adultery and sentenced to death by stoning.

When she first appeared at the Alhaj-Yousf/Bahri Public Order Court in the north of Khartoum, Saadia did not have any legal representation and admitted that she had a relationship with a man while being married to another. She was sentenced to "lapidation" (stoning to death) under Article 146 of the Sudanese Criminal Act of 1991.[i] But, in accordance with Article 144g of Sudan's 1991 Criminal Procedure Law, the judge postponed implementation of the sentence and ordered her to return to court after a month.

Jakarta, May 16, 2015

The commander of Indonesia’s armed forces believes that invasive virginity tests for female recruits are a good thing and the only way to gauge the women’s morality.

By Radhika Chandiramani

Pramada Menon is a queer feminist activist who ponders about all matters she thinks are complex. When not pondering and procrastinating, she works as a consultant on issues of gender and sexuality and women’s rights, and occasionally performs Fat, Feminist and Free, a freewheeling look at body image, sexuality and life.

Indonesia's most prominent  Islamic clerical body has issued a fatwa proposing a host of punishments for

By Alisa Tang

11th February 2015, BANGKOK (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Indonesian officials have dropped a plan to require female students to pass virginity tests in order to graduate from high school and apologised after sparking a public outcry, human rights campaigners said.

Women Living Under Muslim Laws (WLUML) today announced the publishing of its latest Dossier, Dossier 32-33: Sexualities, Culture and Society in Muslim Contexts, available in paperback hard copy and in a free online version.  Extended in size due to a wealth of contributions, the Dossier is the result of collaboration by 17 authors, all leaders in women’s activism and research in Muslim contexts.  It presents case studies from 11 settings: Senegal, Sudan, the East African Coast, Zanzibar, Georgia, Pakistan, Iran, Indonesia, Jordan, Turkey and the USA.  Comprised of in-depth studies and shorter factual reports, the Dossier explores how women and certain men navigate expectations and restrictions relating to sexuality and reproductive rights in their specific contexts.

To read Dossier 32-33 please download the free pdf attached or purchase the hard copy

In both Muslim-majority countries and Muslim communities, the last decade has witnessed unprecedented organizing efforts by human rights defenders around sexual and reproductive rights, and produced evidence of ongoing local engagement around sexuality issues.

Yet, sexuality remains a highly contested and tightly patrolled terrain in all societies, and activists from Muslim contexts are also witnessing troubling trends that threaten previous gains, or seem indicative of a worsening climate. Such trends include the curtailing of sexual and reproductive rights and an increased policing of sexuality: there is a tendency to seek to reverse less restrictive policies or legislations; as well as widespread targeting of individuals, or even of entire groups. Those individuals or groups who bear the brunt of the criminalization of sexuality are often those whose personal circumstances, bodies, sexualities or gender appearance are deemed non-normative. Whether they are girls resisting marriage, divorced women, single women, lesbian women, teenagers who have not undergone FGM in contexts where it is the norm, or heterosexual men deemed ‘effeminate’, many face strict penalties.

لقراءة  الدراسة أرجو الضغط على الوصل أدناه.

http://abaadmena.org/userfiles/file/Resources/VPOO.pdf

By Rochelle Terman

TEHRAN, Iran—When Shadi Amin was growing up in pre-revolutionary Iran, she began experiencing sexual feelings toward other girls. “I thought there was something wrong with me,” she says. “I thought, maybe I should change something.” By “something,” Amin was referring not to her identity or lifestyle, but to her gender. “If I was that young girl living in Iran today, I would have considered having a sex change operation,” even though she has never identified with being male.

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