Indonesia

Rhaya is a 19-year-old from a poor family in Sumatra. She stopped school when she was 16, deciding to look for work as a domestic worker. Rhaya washed clothes in different houses while living at her sister Enny’s house. Enny, is the fourth wife of Abang Setia, with whom she has a young child. About three months after Rhaya started living at her sister's house, Rhaya was raped by Abang Setia. After he had raped her, Abang Setia told her not to tell anyone what had happened or she would be killed. 

With this letter, we the Q-Munity Foundation for Equality in Indonesia as the organizers of the Q! Film Festival along with various organizations and cultural centers, are stating our position and that we are continuing the events of the Q! Film Festival until the end with support from: Goethe-Institut, Centre Culturel Francais, Erasmus Huis, Jakarta Arts Council (Kineforum), Japan Foundation, KONTRAS, Arus Pelangi, Gaya Nusantara, Komnas HAM, Komnas Perempuan, Jurnal Perempuan, Kartini Asia Network, Perempuan Mahardika, Institut Ungu, Ardhanary Institute, Institut Pelangi Perempuan, GWL - INA, Institute for Defense Security and Peace Studies (IDSPS), Ratna Sarumpaet Crisis Center, Human Rights Watch New York, and Berlin Film Festival.

Though the Indonesian government banned female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) four years ago, experts say religious support for the practice is more fervent than ever, particularly in rural communities. A lack of regulation since the ban makes it difficult to monitor, but medical practitioners say FGM/C remains commonplace for women of all ages in this emerging democracy of 240 million - the world’s largest Muslim nation. Although not authorized by the Koran, the practice is growing in popularity.

Deux femmes ont été flagellées en public vendredi pour avoir vendu de la nourriture durant les heures de jeûne du ramadan dans la province d'Aceh, bastion de l'islam en Indonésie, a-t-on appris de source policière.

A month-long film festival featuring lesbian, gay, bisexual and transsexual (LGBT) issues will open on Friday in Indonesia, the only such event screened anywhere in the Muslim world. The Q! Film Festival represents one of the largest gay pride festivals in Asia with more than 150 films, fringe events on sexuality and LGBT-themed book launches planned for six cities across this predominantly Muslim country. 

When a record 101 women won seats in Indonesia's House of Representatives in the 2009 election, development groups said it was proof that the world's largest Muslim nation was ready to back female politicians and a gender quota system that the country had recently rejected wasn't in fact needed.

Since the enactment of Indonesia's pornography law No. 44 year 2008, therefore we, from Women’s activists coalition of South Sulawesi rejected the bill and urged the government to withdraw the law.  Our legal effort that we have done by doing a judicial review of this pornography act was rejected by the constitutional court. Update on Indonesia: Law’s definition of pornography open to multiple interpretations

Though the Indonesian government banned female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) four years ago, experts say religious support for the practice is more fervent than ever, particularly in rural communities. A lack of regulation since the ban makes it difficult to monitor, but medical practitioners say FGM/C remains commonplace for women of all ages in this emerging democracy of 240 million - the world’s largest Muslim nation.

Nahdlatul Ulama (NU) and the National Commission on Violence Against Women and Children are hopeful their newly launched book will change the views of the Indonesian Muslim community surrounding women and their rights. Breaking the Silence: Religion listens to the voice of women victims of violence for the sake of justice, launced on June 30, is intended to serve as a reference for clerics, Islamic women's organizations and the government, in promoting progressi

A banner with a picture of a young, bespectacled Christian man is draped in front of the mosque, a fiery noose around his neck and the words: "This man deserves the death penalty!" Churches are shut down. And an Islamic youth militia prepares for its first day of training. Though the events all occur less than 5 miles (10 kilometers) from Indonesia's bustling capital, making headlines in local papers and dominating chats on social networking sites such as Facebook, they've spaked little public debate in the halls of power.

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