Fundamentalisms

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Edited by Algerian sociologist and WLUML founder, Marieme Hélie-Lucas, this bumper dossier brings you papers by over 15 contributors, including Karima Bennoune: The Law of the Republic Versus the ‘Law of the Brothers': A story of France’s law banning religious symbols in public; Pragna Patel: Cohesion, Multi-Faithism and the Erosion of Secular Spaces in the UK: Implications for the human rights of minority women; and Gita Sahgal: ‘The Question Asked by Satan’: Doubt, dissent and discrimination in 21st-century Britain

Following the announcement that the ban against women in stadiums would stay in tact, two Friday imams have called for Iranians to pursue  “religious and revolutionary values” in their daily lives.

“The idea of letting women to go to sport stadiums to watch matches has many immoral and negative social consequences,” said Hassan Mosleh during his sermon in Borazjan, Bushehr province, on Friday, 17 April.

On 24th April 2015, TEDxExter will be happening, with the theme "Taking the Long View".  During the morning connections on "Global Connection", WLUML Board member Karima Bennoune will be appearing via video at 12.19pm BST, giving a follow-up to last year's talk, "When People of Muslim Heritage Challenge Fundamentalism." Also of interest to WLUML will be Chetan Bhatt's talk about origin myths and fundamentalisms, given at 11.59am BST.

Watch the Livestream of the event.

All music was banned in northern Mali in 2012 by Islamist militants. But musicians such as Khaira Arby refused to accept it. The last two years have seen a collective of musicians taking Mali's rich musical heritage on a grand Caravan of Peace – an offshoot of Mali's famous Festival in the Desert. Created to celebrate Music Freedom Day, this short film is a companion to the feature length documentary They Will Have to Kill us First. Can the musicians of Mali rescue their music in exile?

By Amy Braunschweiger

Last August, the world watched in horror as the extremist armed group Islamic State, also known as ISIS, attacked Iraq’s Yezidi community. Thousands fled without food or water into the nearby Sinjar mountains, but ISIS fighters waylaid many, executing men and abducting thousands of people, mainly women and children. Rumors of forced marriage and enslavement of Yezidi girls and women swirled, and were later confirmed as a trickle of women and girls – now numbering into the hundreds – escaped. Human Rights Watch researchers Samer Muscati andRothna Begum interviewed 20 of these women and girls and shared their findings with Amy Braunschweiger.

Religious Fundamentalisms Impact on Women’s Rights in Africa
April 21, 2015 
Carleton University. Humanities Theatre, 303 Paterson Hall (Ottawa)


The Africa-Canada Forum (ACF), one of the working groups of the Canadian Council for International Co-operation (CCIC), in collaboration with the Institute of African Studies from Carlton University, is organizing a one day learning event on religious fundamentalisms and their impact on women’s rights in Africa. 

Summary

Violence committed “in the name of religion”, that is, on the basis of or arrogated to religious tenets of the perpetrator, can lead to massive violations of human rights, including freedom of religion or belief.

Mohammad Jamil Khan

Two madrasa students have been detained for their alleged involvement with the killing

Radical Islamists hacked to death secular blogger Md Oyasiqur Rahman Babu Monday morning in Tejgaon, Dhaka allegedly for his atheist views.

The massacre that killed 147 people and wounded scores of others at a Kenyan university lasted for hours Thursday before the terror was over.

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