Violence against women

Toutkhal: Kurdistan is one of Iraq’s rare success stories; autonomous from Baghdad since 1991, the region has recently enjoyed an oil boom that’s fuelled foreign investment unknown elsewhere in the country.

And recently Iraqi Kurdistan has been looking closely at its human rights record. Two years ago Female Genital Mutilation was banned, as part of a wide-ranging law to improve women’s rights, and since then the rate of FGM has fallen dramatically.

But how have they achieved this? Kurdistan is very much the exception.

في خضم الأحداث التي تجري في مصر منذ 28 حزيران- يونيو و حتى كتابة هذا المقال، تعتري البلاد موجات عنف واستقطاب سياسي حاد، ويتساقط المصريون بانتماءاتهم المختلفة  قتلى ومصابين في صراع يعلم الله متى ينتهي وإلى أي منقلب سننقلب.

بين كل الضحايا الذين سيقوا إلى مذابح -بسبب تشبث طرف بالسلطة وبسبب رغبة أطراف أخرى في إعادة صياغة الموقف السياسي باستخدام البطاقة الأخيرة وهي الحشد  الجماهيري ووضع الطرف الأول أمام الأمر الواقع- لفت نظري بعض الملاحظات لها علاقة بدور النساء في الأحداث الجارية واستخدامهن.

A paper from the Seventh EU Anti-Trafficking Day, Vilnius, Lithuania, October 18, 2013 
 
“Exploring the Links between the Internet and Trafficking in Human Beings: 
Cyberspace for Prevention, not Recruitment” (Donna M. Hughes, Professor, University of Rhode Island)

We did it! Women Living Under Muslim Laws (WLUML) are delighted to announce that our petition, part of the Global Campaign to Stop Stoning Women, has received 10,000 signatures!  Reaching this target more than a month ahead of schedule is testament to how strongly people feel worldwide about bringing an end to stoning.  WLUML would like to thank everyone who signed the petition and said NO to this abhorrent practice.

Social Good Summit, New York – A thought-provoking discussion on violence against women and children took place this afternoon at the Social Good Summit. Bringing together Anthony Lake, Executive Director of UNICEF, former child soldier and activist Ishmael Beah , journalist and co-founder of Man Up Jimmie Briggs, and Rebecca Chiao, the co-founder and Director, HarassMap, the dialogue focused on how to make the invisible visible.

This report is a comprehensive statistical overview of female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) in the 29 countries where the practice is concentrated. Analysisof the data reflects current perspectives on FGM/C, informed by the latest policy, programmatic and theoretical evidence. The purpose of the report is to generate an in-depth understanding of FGM/C that can be applied to the development of policies and programmes, with the ultimate aim of eliminating the practice.

Equality Now has been monitoring multiple cases of Kenyan girls running away from their homes or avoiding going home from school during holidays to escape female genital mutilation (FGM) and child marriage, particularly during the August and December school holidays when mass mutilations are performed. The Pokot region, especially, has had a high number of reports of girls running away from home or refusing to return home from school. Despite the existence of Kenyan laws against FGM and child marriage, it is clear that they are not being implemented in the region to protect girls.

Forced marriages result from harmful traditional practices1 justified in the name of cultural, economic, political and/or legal standards. Forced marriages are a phenomenon tantamount to slavery, as explicated in a report by a United Nations Special Rapporteur, and often affect boys and girls under 18 years of age, especially under 10. 2 Global statistics demonstrate that every minute an average of 27 girls are forced into marriage.

To mark the United Nations 'International Day of the Girl Child', Justice for Iran (JFI), an NGO based in London, UK, has released a report titled "Stolen Lives, Empty Classrooms: Child Brides in Iran". The full report may be read here (http://justiceforiran.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/JFI-Girl-Marriage-in-Iran-EN.pdf).

Two months ago, a young mother-of-two was stoned to death by her relatives on the order of a tribal court in Pakistan. Her crime: possession of a mobile phone.

Arifa Bibi’s uncle, cousins and others hurled stones and bricks at her until she died, according to media reports. She was buried in a desert far from her village. It’s unlikely anyone was arrested.

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