stoning

This brief report was created by WLUML as a submission to the UN Secretary General for the 27th session of the Human Rights Council (HRC) on the question of the death penalty.

DUBAI, March 18 (Reuters) - An Iranian woman sentenced to die by stoning for adultery and later given a 10-year jail term instead has been allowed to leave prison, the judiciary said, in a new twist to a case that has triggered years of criticism of Iran's rights record.

A judiciary spokesman told Reuters that Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani had been given "a leave" from prison several weeks ago for good behaviour. He said, without elaborating, that the decision was a sign of "our religion's leniency towards women".

WLUML has released its second edition of the WLUML E-Gazette!

On March 8th, 2013, Women Living Under Muslim Laws (WLUML) and its partner organisations gathered in New York during the 57th session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) to launch The Global Campaign to Stop Stoning Women.

Stoning is not simply a relic of the past. In fourteen countries around the world, this brutal punishment and form of torture continues to exist in the here and now. Please join the campaign against stoning – give us your support and urge the UN to take action on stoning by signing.

الدعوة الملفتة للنظر الى التغيير في إيران هذا العام و التي أطلقتها السيدة مريم رجوي، ليست مجرد دعوة عادية او مجرد کلام منمق و براق کما هو معهود مع العديد من الانظمة الراديکالية و الشمولية وانما هي دعوة في منتهى الجدية و الحزم و ترتکز على أسس و منطلقات سيتم تجسيدها على أرض الواقع.

Soheila Vahdati Bana, a scholar, writer and human rights activist focusing on Iranian women's and children's issues, has written numerous articles against the death penalty and state violence against women, children and ethnic and religious minorities. Her areas of research include the effects of mandatory hijab on the image of Iranian women and their role in society, the recent history of state oppression of followers of the Bahai Faith and child soldiers in Iran. She has also written extensively on the current Islamic Penal Code’s encroachment on women’s rights, the treatment of women as second class citizens and the deprivation of their sexual rights.

 

The U.N. Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment was adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations on December 10, 1984 through resolution 39/46. The Convention entered into force on June 26, 1987.

This United Nations Convention against Torture defines torture as “… any act by which severe pain or suffering, whether physical or mental, is intentionally inflicted on a person for such purposes as obtaining from him or a third person information or a confession, punishing him for an act he or a third person has committed or is suspected of having committed, or intimidating or coercing him or a third person, or for any reason based on discrimination of any kind, when such pain or suffering is inflicted by or at the instigation of or with the consent or acquiescence of a public official or other person acting in an official capacity.”

Dear friends, 

Layla’s life is still in danger. We need you to take action to save her.Layla Ibrahim Issa is a 23-year old mother who was sentenced to death by stoning by the Mayo court in Khartoum, Sudan. We put out an action alert to support Layla earlier this month, and we extend our thanks to those of you who raised their voices; but Layla is still in prison with her 6-month old child. 

This thematic report addresses the topic of gender-related killings of women. Rather  than a new form of  violence, gender-related killings are the extreme manifestation of existing forms of violence against women. Such killings are not isolated  incidents that arise suddenly and unexpectedly, but represent the ultimate act of violence which is experienced in a continuum of violence. Women subjected to continuous violence and living under conditions of gender-based discrimination and threat are always on ―death row, always in fear of execution‖. Globally, the prevalence of different manifestations of gender-related killings is reaching alarming proportions. Culturally and socially embedded, these manifestations continue to be accepted, tolerated or justified—with impunity as the norm.  States‘ responsibility to act with due diligence in the promotion and protection of women‘s rights is largely lacking as regards the killing of women. 

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