The Public Order Police have charged 10 female Christian students with "indecent dress” and subjected them to verbal abuse during their detention. The charge carries the punishment of flogging.

KUALA LUMPUR, June 11, 2015:

Rajina Dhillon

The government has missed the opportunity to help women realise that marital rape is wrong, according to the Women’s Aid Organisation (WAO).

WAO executive director Sumitra Visvanathan said the organisation had witnessed several instances where women were unaware that they should not be coerced into having sex, whether they were in a marital relationship or otherwise.

By Hikma Ahmed, ACAL

Saadia Rajab is a 22 year old Sudanese woman who was charged with adultery and sentenced to death by stoning.

When she first appeared at the Alhaj-Yousf/Bahri Public Order Court in the north of Khartoum, Saadia did not have any legal representation and admitted that she had a relationship with a man while being married to another. She was sentenced to "lapidation" (stoning to death) under Article 146 of the Sudanese Criminal Act of 1991.[i] But, in accordance with Article 144g of Sudan's 1991 Criminal Procedure Law, the judge postponed implementation of the sentence and ordered her to return to court after a month.

Beyond Trousers reveals Sudan's public order regime to promote derogative concept of women and prevent them from executing their economic, political and human rights. It provides an an analysis within the legal and religious context how the Public Order Regime undermines Sudan's capacity to fulfill its obligations under the African Charter and in human rights perspectives mainly for women.

Updated at 10:40 a.m. ET on 2015-04-30

Sharia police in Indonesia’s westernmost province, Aceh, have begun educating the public about a broadening of the Islamic penal code set to go into effect in October this year.

Behaviors punishable under the new regulations – known as Qanun Jinayat – include adultery, rape, sexual harassment, homosexual acts, and falsely accusing others of adultery.

On Tuesday 13th January 2015, women’s rights groups, including Southall Black Sisters, One Law for All, Nari Diganta and the Iranian & Kurdish Women’s Rights Organisation (IKWRO), met with Mark Stobbs, the Law Society’s Director of Legal Policy at the SBS office. Our organisations welcomed the Law Society’s decision to withdraw its guidance on ‘Sharia’ compliant wills that endorsed discrimination against women and children. We also thanked the Law Society for making a public apology. The Law Society showed that it had listened to the voices of BME women’s rights campaigners and other secular organisations that had been alarmed by the original decision.

The press release shown below was issued today by the Law Society in the United Kingdom, announcing their withdrawal of a practice note issuing guidance for writing 'Sharia-compliant' wills.  

In a letter to the Lawyers' Secular Society, the Law Society stated:

By Kecia Ali, May 27 2014

It has been a lousy month for Islamic law.  

First, there was the kidnapping and sale of Nigerian girls by Boko Haram, which claimed religious acceptability for their acts. As Muslim theologian Jerusha Lamptey opined, this is not my sharia.

Hassanal Bolkiah, the Sultan of Brunei, is a cross between a Bond villain and Pastor Fred Phelps of Westboro Baptist Church. In his oil-rich lair, Bolkiah has devised an evil plot to kill all the gays. At least, that's what the Western press and U.S. LGBT groups are saying. Nine months ago, the Sultan promised to phase in a criminal code based on Syariah — Malay for Sharia, Islamic law. This week, Western gay activists decided that that means "outrageous anti-gay legislation." Enough said.