Bangladesh

The Bangladeshi writer Fatemolla is a familiar name, mainly among Internet users/readers interested in the critique of political Islam, especially among Bangladeshi Muslim freethinkers.
WLUML again urges you to respond with increased pressure on the Bangladesh Government regarding their duty to protect minority communities.
Predominantly male protesters carried banners pledging to stop acid throwing. The men, and some acid victims also present at the rally, called for greater government efforts to stop the practice.
Bangladesh's government has recently banned two fringe Islamic political organisations, accusing them of being behind a recent spate of bomb explosions.
A statement issued by 115 women in Dhaka, following the assassination of Shah A M S Kibria and five members of his audience (Abul Hossain, Farid, Manjurul Huda Manju, Siddiq Ali, Abdur Rahim) in a grenade attack on a public meeting in Habiganj, Sylhet.
Nobel Laureate Amartya Sen flew into Dhaka just to award certificates to 32 bright, young women aspiring to come journalists through a programme called the Salma Sobhan Fellowship in Journalism for Women taken up by BRAC and Pratichi Trust.
Salma Sobhan never wanted to be an icon. In fact, she avoided stage lights, but ironically she has become a public figure and now, a year after she left us, she is remembered not only by family and friends, but nationally & internationally by many others.
Religious bigotry, intolerance and the discourse of exclusivity are affecting the entire subcontinent, and not merely Bangladesh, argues Mollica Dastider.
Women's organisations urge progressive, pro-liberation forces.
Religious bigots encouraged apparently by the ban on Ahmadiyya publications intensified aggression to the religious minority sect in a desperate bid to force the government to declare the Ahmadiyyas non-Muslim.
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