Few Sudanese women are land owners despite their role in food production and new discriminatory legislation relating to land registration and tenancy distribution is making ti even more difficult for women agriuc,tural workers to improve their situation. Aksi discusses three case studies which illustrate the following points – when women do not own land, there contribution is meager, when women own land.

This publication provides a number of distinct perspectives from which to explore the connections between humanitarian mine action, post-conflict land rights and livelihoods in Southern Sudan.

 

This country report provides information on the national legal framework including rights entrenched in the Constitution, women's property and use rights in Civil Code, Labour Code,and Family Code, inheritance legal mechanisms , land law and policies/Institutional mechanisms enforcing or preventing women’s land rights, customary law and land tenure and related institutions.

The publication presents perspectives from a number of countries including Sudan reflecting the idea that women’s land, property and housing rights require treatment within a broad human rights framework and that women’s status and condition, as well as their experience of violence, is intimately connected with their ability to exercise fundamental socio-economic and cultural rights. The contribution from Sudan documents the interplay between rights to land and property (or lack thereof) and violence against women.

This is the tenth in a series of articles concerning the Darfur Peace Agreement (DPA), explaining how different parts were negotiated, what the paragraphs mean, and how they should be implemented. This article focuses on the question of land tenure. Conflict over land is one of the major reasons for the war in Darfur.

This publication gives details of the work done on FGM to protect children in Sudan. It also gives a report on research on reproductive health and FGM in Sudan. 

This book explores aspects of Sudanese culture that have a strong impact on the perpetuation of female circumcision in Sudan. This includes: the historical ritual and meaning of the female circumcision ceremony; the importance placed on female circumcision by men in choosing their wives; and the cultural definition of sexuality and ethnic identity. 

The chapter of interest is called “Midwifery Training and the Politics of Female Circumcision”. This chapter discusses the training of Sudanese midwives and supervising all midwifery practices for Sudanese medical services. It engages such people about their cultural norms, gender roles and intimate practices – such as childbirth and female circumcision. 

The establishment of the Republic of South Sudan came with high hopes that it might improve the lives of women there. But women’s rights activists in the country left behind–the mostly Muslim Sudan–are bracing for a battle against an escalation of Islamic fundamentalist law. Following South Sudan’s independence, its neighbor to the north, Sudan, is left in the hands of the widely-acknowledged-to-be-corruptNational Congress Party. President Omar al-Bashir, who took power in a 1989 military coup, was criticized for introducing Sharia law (based upon patriarchal interpretations of the Koran) in 1991, in a move that was opposed by the country’s Christian and Animist population. 

This is a report of the general human rights situation in Sudan from March 2005-2006. The section on women begins on page 63. It addresses the issue of the widespread practice of FGM and the government’s refusal to make the practice illegal; speaks to the instrumenalisation of women in the conflict area of Darfur, and the systematic campaign of sexual violence against them; and contains case studies and statements of victims.

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