South East Asia

Following strong protests from women's and left-wing groups, a US marine has been sentenced to 40 years in prison for raping a local woman in the Philippines last year. About 100 protesters were outside the courthouse for the verdict.
The Asia-Japan Women's Resource Center (AJWRC) has launched an international petition campaign for justice for Filipino rape victim by US military forces, since it is one of most serious human rights concerns in East Asia. They request our cooperation in responding to and disseminating this information widely.
Sisters in Islam share the good news that, because of your overwhelming support and help in response to our previous appeal, the Malaysian government recently announced that it would put on hold the gazetting of the controversial Islamic Family Law (Federal Territories) (Amendment) Bill 2005. The bad news is that this non-gazettement is only valid for the Federal Territories, and not for the remaining states in the federation of Malaysia that have adopted these unjust amendments into their respective Islamic Family Laws. Since Islam is a state matter, it means that Muslim women living in these 11 states continue to be affected by its unjust clauses. They urge you to express your concern ...
We have received this open appeal for support from like-minded Muslim organizations and individuals around the globe to protest the recent passing of the Islamic Family Law (Federal Territories) (Amendment) Bill 2005 by the Malaysian Senate.

Investigation of the historical, legal, and socio-cultural aspects of Muslim women's status in Malaysia. This set of papers is a collection of writings, which emanated from a research project entitled MUSWAL (Muslim Women and Law), sponsored by the Women's Crisis Centre (WCC) Penang.

Introduction

In recent years Islamic doctrine has assumed a more visible place in the Indonesian legal system. This trend arguably dates from the passage of the National Marriage Act in the mid-1970s, which for the first time gave explicit recognition to Islamic doctrine as state law. Its most conspicuous manifestations, however, have occurred since the mid-80s. In 1989 the Religious Judicature Act significantly expanded the system of Islamic courts, ended their subordination to the civil courts, and enlarged the courts' substantive jurisdiction.
Due to the multi-ethnic and multi-religious population of Malaysia, a dichotomy exists between Muslims who are predominantly Malays and the non-Muslims. Article 3 of the Malaysian Constitution enacts that Islam is the religion of the nation. However as a provision in Clause (1) of Article 3, it is guaranteed by the Constitution that non-Muslim nationals would be free to profess and practise their own religions.
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