Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka is in its worse law and order practice in the History once again. Three deaths amongst injured Muslims have confirmed so far following the Aluthgama riots ignited yesterday. 

In August 2005, the Sri Lankan Parliament unanimously passed the Prevention of Domestic Violence Act No 34 (PDVA), marking the culmination of a legal advocacy process initiated by a coalition of women’s NGOs in 1999.

 

Four years since the end of the armed conflict, the situation of minority women in the north and east of Sri Lanka has changed dramatically – and for many it is getting worse. In the latter stages of the conflict and its aftermath, military forces were responsible for a variety of human rights abuses against the civilian population, including extrajudicial killings, disappearance, rape, sexual harassment and other violations. In the current climate of impunity, sustained by insecurity and the lack of military accountability, these abuses continue.

Recently, women in three Kilinochchi villages were subjected to coercive population control.

This incident occurred on August 31, 2013 – at the Veravil government divisional hospital in Kilinochchi.  The affected women reside in Valaipaddu, Veravil and Keranchi; all three are coastal villages.

(New York) – Human Rights Watch mourns the death of Sunila Abeysekera, a prominent and highly respected Sri Lankan activist who spent more than two decades documenting human rights violations in Sri Lanka. Abeysekera passed away in Colombo on September 9, 2013, following a long illness.

According to the news received from Saudi Arabia Rizana Nafeek, who has been the Dawadami Prison since 2005 may be executed at any moment. This was revealed to the BBC Sinhala Service by Dr. Kifaya Iftekhar, who is based in Saudi Arabia and who has been looking after the interests of Rizana for several years now. Dr. Iftekhar also said that the Sri Lankan government has been informed by the Saudi authorities of the possibility of her impending execution.

ALLANKULAM, 8 September 2011 (IRIN) - More policies and programmes must address the needs of female-headed households in Sri Lanka's former conflict zone, experts say. 

"Most programmes don't take into account the unique role of women here," Saroja Sivachandran, director of the Center for Women and Development (CWD), an advocacy body based in northern Jaffna, told IRIN. 

"They may be providing for the families, but [women] still have to cook, look after children and do all household chores." 

MWRAF strives to empower women to realize their full potential, locating itself in the local as well as the larger socio-political context, challenging given ‘codes and norms’, while addressing emerging issues that directly affect people’s lives. It seeks equity and justice for all women in a society free of violence against women and exploitation of women by all patriarchal structures including the family, society, custom, religion, and the state.

ICES is a renowned international research centre located in Sri Lanka. It is amongst the select few institutions that are both ‘local’ to the global South and ‘international’ in orientation. ICES is in ‘special category’ consultative status with the United Nations ECOSOC. The mission of ICES is “to deepen the understanding of ethnicity, identity politics and conflict, and to foster conditions for an inclusive, just and peaceful society nationally, regionally and globally, through research, publication, dialogue, creative expression and knowledge transfer”.

The study reviews the formal and customary laws and practices governing the rights of women to inherit land in six South Asian countries (Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka). The study includes an analysis of existing laws and customs and their impact on inheritance and land rights in all six countries. It also provides recommendations for how to design interventions that can attempt to improve women’s inheritance rights.

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