Resources

16/12/2013

In 2012, a two-part study on the state of forced marriage was undertaken by Women Living Under Muslim Laws (WLUML) for its program on culturally-justified violence against women, supported by the Women’s Empowerment and Leadership Development for Democratisation (WELDD) consortium. This report is the documentation of that study and was subsequently revised as WLUML’s submission to the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) for its report on preventing and eliminating child, early and forced marriage.

4/12/2013
 
What is follow-up and why is it important?
 
Follow-up activities aim at ensuring that recommendations and decisions by human rights mechanisms and bodies are implemented so as to
improve respect, protection and fulfilment of all human rights for all. UN human rights mechanisms and bodies seek to improve the
realization of human rights in all countries of the world. Resolutions adopted by the Human Rights Council, the findings of Commissions of
Inquiry, recommendations of treaty bodies, special procedures and the universal periodic review, and decisions of treaty bodies on individual
cases all aim at closing protection gaps and indicate ways for States and other stakeholders to advance towards the full realization of human
rights. All these findings, recommendations and decisions aim at producing a change for the better in the lives of rights-holders. The primary obligation to realize such change lies with States, which bear the duty to respect, protect and fulfil human rights. However, all parts of society, from individuals to the private sector, the international community and CSAs have a role to play in the realization of human rights. Civil  society, in particular, can play a crucial role in following up on human rights recommendations.

4/12/2013

Key points from ICAN’s Libya brief:

  • Libya women played a crucial role in the revolution and were initially part of mediation and transition discussions, but have since been dismissed as stake holders by the transitional government and international actors.
  • Libyan women are fighting for formal comprehensive investigations and justice for victims of sexual violence perpetrated within the Qadhafi regime, during the revolution and in the transitional period.
  • International actors who previously committed to the UN Security Council Resolutions on Women, Peace and Security have failed to implement the agenda consistently and in all spheres, particularly in security sector reform discussions.
  • Libya women face rising religious extremism and non-inclusive electoral laws which inhibit independent voices in the political sphere
28/11/2013

The WLUML E-Gazette is a monthly publication sent out to subscribers which aims to shed light upon the activities of the network as well as important news about women in the Muslim world. The contents of the newsletter include the achievements of several networkers and ICO members, several events and conferences of relevance to the WLUML network, and valuable news pieces. We hope you enjoy this edition of the Gazette!

28/11/2013

Overview of contents:

- Introduction

  Challenges to document VAW in Syria 
 
  Legal framework 

 

- Violation of the Rights to life 

  Killings of women in the context of military fighting 

  Execution of women during massacres 

  Use of women as human shields 

25/11/2013

The WLUML E-Gazette is a monthly publication sent out to subscribers which aims to shed light upon the activities of the network as well as important news about women in the Muslim world. The contents of the newsletter include the achievements of several networkers and ICO members, several events and conferences of relevance to the WLUML network, and valuable news pieces. We hope you enjoy this edition of the Gazette!

22/11/2013

A report by Dr Chris Allen and his team at the University of Birmingham based on data from Tell MAMA (Measuring Anti-Muslim Hate).

The report discusses the disproportionate targetting of women in Anti-Muslim abuse and concludes that women showing 'visible identifiers' of 'Muslimness' - i.e. headscarves - suffer such abuse at higher levels.

The read the full report, click here or download the pdf.

19/11/2013

ABOUT

In order to delve into the area of masculinities and son preference deeper, ICRW in partnership with UNFPA have conducted a study on men’s attitudes around son preference in seven states of India. The study looks at men’s attitudes and practices around gender inequality, son preference, and gender based violence. The objective is to understand predictors of masculinities and how varying forms of masculinity aff ect men’s desire for sons and their perpetration of violence against their intimate partners.

19/11/2013

ABSTRACT

This study examines how austerity measures may have adversely affected children and women in a sample of 128 developing countries in 2012. It relies on International Monetary Fund (IMF) fiscal projections and IMF country reports to gauge how social assistance and other public spending decisions have evolved since the start of the global economic crisis. The study finds that most developing countries boosted total expenditures during the first phase of the crisis (2008–09); but beginning in 2010, budget contraction became widespread, with ninety-one governments cutting overall spending in 2012. Moreover, the data suggest that nearly one-quarter of developing countries underwent excessive fiscal contraction, defined as cutting expenditures below pre-crisis levels. Governments considered four main options to achieve fiscal consolidation – wage bill cuts/caps, phasing out subsidies, further targeting social safety nets, and reforming old-age pensions – each of which would be likely to have a disproportionately negative impact on children and women.

18/11/2013
The purpose of this Code of Ethics is to help individual journalists, media persons, management and owners of media houses to promote gender justice in their organizational policies as well as in their professions to become better at their work, by accepting and applying an established understanding of the expected universal gender-sensitive standards, attitudes and behaviour. This Code deals with the following six main areas: Right to Privacy; Pictorial Depiction of Women; Balanced Representation of Women; Projection of Gender Roles in Advertisements; Quality Coverage of Women’s Issues and Maintaining Professional Standards.