This document, entitled "Remembering" was created by Women Living Under Muslim Laws and delivered as a powerpoint presentation during the 59th session of the CSW to review the 15th year of the Beijing Declaration and Platform of Action.  Despite significant breakthroughs in the past 20 years, violence against women and girls justified in the name of religion, customs, traditions – in short, culture - remains unabated. Women continue to be persecuted and killed for making choices in life that are perceived to defy social norms.  The presentation was created as a tribute to these women, to honour them and their sacrifices.

Please download the file attached here to view the pdf.

A Powerpoint version is available here.


WLUML is pleased to announce it has joined forces with the Women's Alliance for Kurdistan Iraq and Syria, and will march with the Alliance on the 7th March to call for the liberation of all women under “IS” control on the occasion of International Women’s Day. 

We invite you to download and share this flyer, and to march with us and join the call to end violence against women.   


The WLUML E-Gazette is a quarterly publication sent out to subscribers which aims to shed light upon the activities of the network and share important updates about women's and gender issues in the Muslim world and beyond. 


Gender equality: Building our strength together

Annual Report 2013  Women Living Under Muslim Laws
Please download the pdf for the full report.


Introducing Religious Fundamentalism
The world is less than 500 days away from the targeted day to reach the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), eight goals and 18 targets set by the United Nations and governments to tackle some of the worst problems that have impeded developing nations.

Violence against women, as well as women’s vulnerability to violence, has increased dramatically in the Euro-Mediterranean region from 2011 to early 2014.
Violence against women is recognized as a human rights violation and States have committed themselves to preventing and combating all forms of violence against women, and to end impunity for perpetrators.
War in Syria has killed more than 10,000  children. More than 1 million more have fled the country in fear, while millions more  remain displaced inside the country.This briefing looks at another disturbing but less  publicised impact of the cr
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To read Dossier 32-33 please download the free pdf attached or purchase the hard copy

In both Muslim-majority countries and Muslim communities, the last decade has witnessed unprecedented organizing efforts by human rights defenders around sexual and reproductive rights, and produced evidence of ongoing local engagement around sexuality issues.

Yet, sexuality remains a highly contested and tightly patrolled terrain in all societies, and activists from Muslim contexts are also witnessing troubling trends that threaten previous gains, or seem indicative of a worsening climate. Such trends include the curtailing of sexual and reproductive rights and an increased policing of sexuality: there is a tendency to seek to reverse less restrictive policies or legislations; as well as widespread targeting of individuals, or even of entire groups. Those individuals or groups who bear the brunt of the criminalization of sexuality are often those whose personal circumstances, bodies, sexualities or gender appearance are deemed non-normative. Whether they are girls resisting marriage, divorced women, single women, lesbian women, teenagers who have not undergone FGM in contexts where it is the norm, or heterosexual men deemed ‘effeminate’, many face strict penalties.


Sexual violence is one of the most horrific crimes committed during conflict. No one should have to endure the pain and humiliation of rape and sexual exploitation and violence, and it is particularly deplorable when a child is subjected to this brutality. The prevalence in conflict of sexual violence against children is shocking.