Resources

Cover image
30/12/1998

The dilemma of the Iranian regime in dealing with one of its very successful large scale public mobilizations in the seemingly innocuous activity of low-income women delivering basic health and family planning information.

Cover image
28/10/1996

The materials included in this Special Dossier are largely derived from data generated through the WLUML Women and Law programme and its country project components.

Cover image
15/9/1996

Your regular Dossiers finally reappear and in a new format. In the meantime, we have devoted our energies to urgent cases requiring urgent actions. We have been producing two Special Dossiers, on “Women in wars and conflict situations - Initiatives in their defence” (one on ex-Yugoslavia and one on Algeria). These publications were linked to broader activities of the WLUML international solidarity network in initiating actions in defence of women in wars and conflict situations; our concern and activities were voiced at a special workshop held during the NGO Forum of the UN Conference on Women in Beijing.

Cover image
27/8/1996

As a network, Women Living Under Muslim Laws is part of the global women's movement and closely following the developments of interactions and alliances between women's organisations and networks.

Cover image
27/7/1996

There is a tendency in the West to exaggerate the gap between the evolution of Western family laws and the evolution of family laws in Muslim countries. By comparing the changes in the legal definitions of marriage and the relationship of the spouses in French law, the secular laws of Turkey, and the laws of North African countries, this article reveals similar patterns in legal evolution on the northern and southern shores of the Mediterranean.

Cover image
27/6/1996

In contemporary debates regarding Muslim identity in South Asia no issue is as prominent or as hotly contested as the character and social role of Islamic law. Though the controversies are directly relevant to present day concerns the questions themselves are neither new nor innocent of colonial influence. The existing corpus of Islamic law in the subcontinent owes a great deal to the legacy of colonial jurists who systematised and gave shape to Anglo-Muhammadan law over many decades.