Resources

29/1/2014
Introduction
 
Compare these two statements:
 
"The fundamentals of the Shari‘a are rooted in wisdom and promotion of the welfare of human beings in this life and the hereafter.
8/1/2014

Conclusions:

As shown in this report the recorded statistics on violence against women during the first six months of the current year has reached a shocking number of 4154 cases.

This figure indicates an increase of nearly 25 percent compared to the number of violence against women recorded in the first six months of the previous year. However, this increase could be due to increased public confidence in the AIHRC’s offices, but can be caused by other factors such as increased violence against women and the public's distrust of judicial authorities as well.

In any way, this high figure of violence against women in the first half of this year is very shocking and a matter to be pondered upon. Especially when we see that over 30% of the figures are physical violence, especially beating, slapping, kicking and throwing stones, the issue becomes more and more worrying because physical violence against women is the naked (harsh) form of violence against women.

31/12/2013
 
"This paper is the first of a series of three factsheets on different pertinent issues concerning gender equality and sustainable development. In the context of the post-2015 agenda negotia-tions, we asked SDC Gender Focal Points around the world, which issues they deemed to be most important with regards to sustainable development and gender equality. Responses came in from different corners of the earth, highlighting that the main issues people were struggling with in their countries and in their day-to-day work were: Violence against women, political participation and economic empowerment.

Cover image
30/12/2013

This report looks at women's potential contributions to peacebuilding from the under-explored angle of natural resources, relating the ways they use, manage, benefit from the latter to their access to participation in peacebuilding.

To read the report in full please download the pdf.

 

23/12/2013

The WLUML E-Gazette is a monthly publication sent out to subscribers which aims to shed light upon the activities of the network as well as important news about women in the Muslim world. The contents of the newsletter include the achievements of several networkers and ICO members, several events and conferences of relevance to the WLUML network, and valuable news pieces. We hope you enjoy this edition of the Gazette!

19/12/2013

Despite national laws and international commitments, child marriage remains a real threat for many in Pakistan. According to the Pakistan Demographic and Household Survey (PDHS 2006-7), 13 percent of girls in the country are married by the time they are 15 and 40 percent by 18 years. 18% of Pakistani women have had their first birth by age 18; 9% have begun child bearing between 15-19 years and 7% are already mothers in those ages leading to one of the highest infant mortality rates in South Asia (PDHS 2006-7).

19/12/2013

The following submission, is presented to the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights on the occasion of the 26th session of the Human Rights Council, and provides a brief summary of violations of rights of girl children in the Islamic republic of Iran as a result of laws that permit and indeed condone the practice of early marriage in that country.

16/12/2013

In 2012, a two-part study on the state of forced marriage was undertaken by Women Living Under Muslim Laws (WLUML) for its program on culturally-justified violence against women, supported by the Women’s Empowerment and Leadership Development for Democratisation (WELDD) consortium. This report is the documentation of that study and was subsequently revised as WLUML’s submission to the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) for its report on preventing and eliminating child, early and forced marriage.

4/12/2013
 
What is follow-up and why is it important?
 
Follow-up activities aim at ensuring that recommendations and decisions by human rights mechanisms and bodies are implemented so as to
improve respect, protection and fulfilment of all human rights for all. UN human rights mechanisms and bodies seek to improve the
realization of human rights in all countries of the world. Resolutions adopted by the Human Rights Council, the findings of Commissions of
Inquiry, recommendations of treaty bodies, special procedures and the universal periodic review, and decisions of treaty bodies on individual
cases all aim at closing protection gaps and indicate ways for States and other stakeholders to advance towards the full realization of human
rights. All these findings, recommendations and decisions aim at producing a change for the better in the lives of rights-holders. The primary obligation to realize such change lies with States, which bear the duty to respect, protect and fulfil human rights. However, all parts of society, from individuals to the private sector, the international community and CSAs have a role to play in the realization of human rights. Civil  society, in particular, can play a crucial role in following up on human rights recommendations.

4/12/2013

Key points from ICAN’s Libya brief:

  • Libya women played a crucial role in the revolution and were initially part of mediation and transition discussions, but have since been dismissed as stake holders by the transitional government and international actors.
  • Libyan women are fighting for formal comprehensive investigations and justice for victims of sexual violence perpetrated within the Qadhafi regime, during the revolution and in the transitional period.
  • International actors who previously committed to the UN Security Council Resolutions on Women, Peace and Security have failed to implement the agenda consistently and in all spheres, particularly in security sector reform discussions.
  • Libya women face rising religious extremism and non-inclusive electoral laws which inhibit independent voices in the political sphere