Resources

Cover image
6/8/2010

In the summer issue of the WLUML newsletter, Fatou Sow asks: “To ban or not to ban the burqa?” – that is a question in the European Union; Belgium and France banned it lately, so the debate continues at a high political level amongst many other member states, provoking contradictory responses across the world. Meanwhile in Iran, a year after the disputed elections of 2009, the women’s movement faces growing suppression from the authorities. We feature an article by Leila Mouri, which examines the impact of the government crackdown on the status of women and their activism in Iran today.

Cover image
19/5/2010

In the new Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung publication, Religious Fundamentalisms and Their Gendered Impacts in Asia, Claudia Derichs and Andrea Fleschenberg (eds.), there is a chapter by WLUML board member, Zarizana Abdul Aziz: 'Malaysia – Trajectory towards Secularism or Islamism?' Abdul Aziz writes, "As the Malaysian legal system moves closer towards accommodating syariah, there has been an increase in inter-ethnic and inter-religious tensions.

28/4/2010

This is the first thematic report submitted to the Human Rights Council by Rashida Manjoo, Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences, since her appointment in June 2009. In addition to providing an overview of the main activities carried out by the Special Rapporteur, the report focuses on the topic of reparations to women who have been subjected to violence in contexts of both peace and post-conflict.

28/3/2010

In this first report to the Human Rights Council, the independent expert in the field of cultural rights, Farida Shaheed, develops preliminary views on the conceptual and legal framework of her mandate.

Cover image
22/3/2010

The Global Campaign to Stop Killing and Stoning Women is pleased to announce the publication of their first Policy Briefing Series on culturally-justified violence against women (CVAW). Launched on March 3rd, 2010 at their panel discussion at the 54th UN Commission on the Status of Women, the Series is a valuable resource for those working on issues of CVAW.

Cover image
3/3/2010

The WLUML Newsletter has a new look! Introducing a more contemporary design and reader-friendly format, the Spring 2010 issue has all the same sections as Newsletter 8: Editorial and Solidarity; Campaigns; Women’s Empowerment and Activism; News from Networkers; Reviews; Events and Announcements. On this issue's cover are the objectives and strategies of the 4th WLUML Feminist Leadership Institute that took place in Dakar, Senegal, from 09-20 November, 2009 and on page 5 we hear from one of its participants, May El Sallab.

26/2/2010

In March of 2008, Women Living under Muslim Laws and Concordia University organized a symposium to discuss the impact of Muslim women's invovlement in sports, especially in the context of Iran. Some Muslim women athletes have used sport to inscribe resistant meanings that challenge social norms, while others have used it to express and reinforce these norms. The full report is attached.

Cover image
28/1/2010

Committee on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW): Consideration of reports submitted by States parties under article 18 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women.

Cover image
26/1/2010

This paper by Stephanie Willman Bordat and Saida Kouzzi is part of the IDLO book series Lessons Learned: Narrative Accounts of Legal Reform in Developing and Transition Countries. The term “unwed mother” is used here to refer to women who have children outside the framework of legal marriage. They and their children – defined by law as “illegitimate” – are among the most legally and socially marginalized people in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, not just in Morocco.

Cover image
26/1/2010

This essay argues that CEDAW’s concept of equality is what is needed to end discrimination against women. It first traces the background of the controversy over the use of the terms equity and equality in international human rights law. Finally, to further demonstrate the importance of CEDAW’s principles of equality, and particularly that of substantive equality, it provides some illustrations of the positive impact these principles have had on domestic gender jurisprudence.