United Kingdom

Universities UK (UUK) has issued guidance on external speakers saying that the segregation of the sexes at universities is not discriminatory as long as “both men and women are being treated equally, as they are both being segregated in the same way.” 

A report by Dr Chris Allen and his team at the University of Birmingham based on data from Tell MAMA (Measuring Anti-Muslim Hate).

The report discusses the disproportionate targetting of women in Anti-Muslim abuse and concludes that women showing 'visible identifiers' of 'Muslimness' - i.e. headscarves - suffer such abuse at higher levels.

The read the full report, click here or download the pdf.

Haroon Siddique

20th November 2013

Muslim women are more likely to be subjected to Islamophobic attacks than men, especially if they are wearing the niqab or other clothing associated with their religion, a study has found.

Maybe We Are Hated, a report on the impact of Islamophobic attacks, written by Dr Chris Allen, a social policy lecturer at the University of Birmingham, will be launched in the House of Commons on Wednesday. It is intended to look beyond the statistics and, for the first time, give a voice to the female victims of Islamophobia.

Coming to the event

  • Date and time: Wednesday 23 October 2013 , 6.30-8pm
  • Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE
  • Speakers: Professor Karima Bennoune 
  • Chair: Professor Chetan Bhatt 
  • Suggested twitter hashtag: #LSEBennoune

Asian girls are the hidden victims of child grooming gangs, dipping under the radar of police or social services, according to a report released on Tuesday.

This June 2013, Women Living Under Muslim Laws traveled to Nottingham for the 2013 Feminist and Women’s Studies Association conference. In the course of a lively discussion about religion, secularism, law and gender discrimination ignited by our name and history we found itself at the centre of what one member of the audience called the most exciting debate of the day.

There are some stories that remain with you. 

One such incident is of a young 15-year-old girl, Aliya*. The eldest of seven children, her mother and father had their hands full with the younger children. Aliya was neglected emotionally, and in order to grasp the attention of her parents or to find someone to appreciate or love her she began to play truant. 

Bishops of the Church of England are holding an emergency meeting at the General Synod to decide how to respond to the failure of legislation that would have allowed women to join their ranks.

United Kingdom: The murder of Banaz Mahmod by her family in 2006 shocked the country. A documentary now tells her story. 

Jasvinder Sanghera was eight years old when she was promised in marriage to a man she had never met. When, six years later, her mother showed Sanghera a photograph of her intended husband, the 14-year-old reacted with horror.

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