Indonesia

The rise of religious fundamentalism and the prevalence of conservative values, such as a belief in the primacy of men over women, have led many people to hold a negative perception of Islam in Indonesia.
Solidaritas Perempuan is coordinating the campaign "Stop Regional Policies that Discriminate and Criminalise Women" was launched on 28 April 2008, and is a 'sister campaign' to the Global Campaign to Stop Killing and Stoning Women.
An increasing number of Muslim women are choosing to divorce their husbands rather than continue in a polygamous marriage, data from national Islamic courts show.
Activists and concerned citizens across Indonesia are denouncing a new Anti-Pornography law passed in October 2008, which they feel will endanger Indonesian unity as well as women's rights and sexual rights.
In her boarding schools, Lily Munir teaches women and children that their religion supports gender equality.
Wearing headscarves and reciting the Koran, students at an Indonesian Islamic school look like ordinary women practicing their faith in the holy month of Ramadan, but they are actually transvestites.
Pour permettre aux travestis et aux homosexuels de pratiquer le culte musulman en toute liberté, une école coranique leur a été dédiée dans un hameau non loin de Jogjakarta, une ville de Java, relate le Jakarta Post.
La liberté religieuse dans le pays musulman le plus peuplé du monde est désormais clairement menacée, ont affirmé mardi des intellectuels indonésiens en accusant le gouvernement de se plier aux exigences des intégristes islamiques.
""Islamic" paramilitary groups claim constantly that they are the true defenders of Islam, saying Allahu Akbar (Allah is great) while at the same time lashing women with bamboo."
Though Indonesia's contemporary artists enjoy an enthusiastic audience, they increasingly feel that Islamist moralizers are interfering with their creativity.
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