Egypt

ECWR was shocked when it received the decision of the State Council, Egypt’s Administrative Court, to defer the appointment of female judges, although consensus of the Special Council was reached, allowing women to be appointed to judicial positions. The State Council attributed reason for the delay in approving the appointment of female judges to regulation problems, including a lack of safe and secure places for women to stay when presiding over a trial and a lack of nurseries for their children.

On June 6, a pair of police officers entered an Alexandria Internet cafe and began asking for the identification documents of everyone present. When 28-year-old Khaled Said objected to being searched without a warrant, the officers began to attack him, beating his head against a table and kicking him in the chest. They tied his hands behind his back and dragged him to a nearby building where they continued to smash his head, first against an iron door and then against the building's marble steps. Witnesses heard Khaled begging them to stop, screaming "I'm going to die," to which the officers responded: "You're going to die anyway." The officers dragged Said into their police car and drove him away, only to return several minutes later to leave his lifeless corpse in the street.

The year 2009 has highlighted the recurring situations confronting defenders in the southern and eastern Mediterranean. These situations are closely linked to the nature of their activities but they are also related to broad political trends at the national and international levels. It is in this context that the Euro-Mediterranean Foundation of Support to Human Rights Defenders (EMHRF) increased its responsibilities and provided assistance to 36 defenders in 2009.

La Fondation euro-méditerranéenne de soutien aux défenseurs des droits de l’Homme (FEMDH) qui a pour objectif de soutenir les défenseurs dans les pays du sud de la méditerranée publie aujourd’hui son rapport annuel 2009. Le rapport met l’accent sur les actions entreprises par la FEMDH au cours de l’année 2009.

La justice égyptienne a annoncé le 3 janvier que les étudiantes portant le niqab seraient désormais interdites d’examen. Elle donne ainsi raison au ministère de l’Éducation supérieure qui, par cette mesure, déclare vouloir éviter les fraudes. Entre porter le niqab et passer des examens en Égypte, il faut désormais choisir. Le 3 janvier, un tribunal égyptien a décidé que les Égyptiennes revêtant le voile intégral, celui ne laissant entrevoir que les yeux, ne seraient plus autorisées à passer leurs épreuves.

Alexandria's beautiful Corniche by the Mediterranean is one of the most romantic places for a young couple in love to take a stroll. However, there is a sinister side to this picturesque scene that few talk about. At any given time, the coast is crawling with the policemen and plainclothes thugs of the morality police, searching for (unmarried) couples cuddling in a secluded area to terrify and blackmail.

يسعدنا دعوتكم للمشاركة في الحوار والجدل حول الرجولة المتغيرة وذلك من خلال المدونة الخاصة بمشروع الرجولة المتغيرة، المجتمعات المحلية المتغيرة. وهذا الحوار الالكتروني هو أحد أنشطة المشروع الذي ينفذه المعهد الدنماركي المصري للحوار(ديدي) بالتعاون مع المركز الدنماركي للمعلومات عن النوع والمساواة والعرق (كفينفو) بعنوان "الرجوله المتغيرة، المجتمعات المحلية المتغيرة".

We are pleased to announce the blog launch for Changing Masculinities, Changing Communities. The blog is an activity pertaining to the project implemented by The Danish Egyptian Dialogue Institute (DEDI) in cooperation with the Danish Center for Information on Gender, Equality and Ethnicity (KVINFO) in 2010 titled Changing Masculinities, Changing Communities, facilitating the meeting of a group of Egyptian and Danish activists, artists, academics and social workers in Cairo and Copenhagen whose work involves an exploration and awareness of masculinity as a crucial factor in the construction of social relations and its impact on communities. 

في ممرات جامعة القاهرة يشاهد العديد من الطلبة والطالبات الذين يجلسون بجانب بعضهم ولا يندر مشاهدة عدد منهم وهم يمسكون بأيدي بعضهم في الزوايا القصية

Emergency Law used to detain citizens for two months because of their religious beliefs: The Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights (EIPR) today urged the Minister of Interior to release immediately nine Egyptians detained under the Emergency Law for two months because of their affiliation with the Ahmadi confession. The organization called on the Public Prosecutor to order an end to the Supreme State Security Prosecutor’s investigation of all detainees on charges of “contempt of religions” and hold to account those officials responsible for the arrest and interrogation of citizens solely for exercising their constitutional right to freedom of belief and expression. 

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