Violence against women

On June 7-8, 2006, partners from 6 African countries and the UK met to prepare a plan to fight FGM and early marriage at the international conference on "FGM and Early Marriage from the Religious and Legal Perspectives."
A United Nations envoy has arrived in Turkey to investigate a reported surge in the number of young women committing suicide.
Sharla Musabih's mobile phone hardly stops alerting her with messages from female victims of domestic violence seeking help or refuge in the Dubai-based shelter she runs. Some sound very desperate.
A review of '''Honour': Crimes, Paradigms, and Violence Against Women'', edited by Lynn Welchman and Sara Hossain.
Recently in Abuja, Nigeria, the Sudanese government and the main rebel group in Darfur signed a peace agreement to end three years of fighting. A ceasefire was supposed to come into force 72 hours later. But little has changed on the ground in Darfur.

For years, the accepted wisdom was that human rights principles and law applied only, or mainly, to the mediation of the relationship between citizens and the State. This view was held and promoted by, among others, academics, lawyers and jurists, as well as many international non-governmental organizations (INGOs) and activists.

Women lawmakers from across the globe on Sunday denounced rape and sexual violence during armed conflict especially in Sudan's volatile region of Darfur.
There is a slow process within human rights organisations that started twenty years ago: it aims at fully incorporating women's rights within their mandate.
It is estimated by the United Nations Population Fund that as many as 5000 women and girls are murdered by family members each year in so-called “honor killings” around the world.
Anyone reporting an honour killing case to the police or filing a case with the court will be killed by the jirga since the publicising of such cases has brought a bad name to the area, Malik Faiz Muhammad, member of the Nihag-Wari jirga, said on Friday.
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