stoning

This thematic report addresses the topic of gender-related killings of women. Rather  than a new form of  violence, gender-related killings are the extreme manifestation of existing forms of violence against women. Such killings are not isolated  incidents that arise suddenly and unexpectedly, but represent the ultimate act of violence which is experienced in a continuum of violence. Women subjected to continuous violence and living under conditions of gender-based discrimination and threat are always on ―death row, always in fear of execution‖. Globally, the prevalence of different manifestations of gender-related killings is reaching alarming proportions. Culturally and socially embedded, these manifestations continue to be accepted, tolerated or justified—with impunity as the norm.  States‘ responsibility to act with due diligence in the promotion and protection of women‘s rights is largely lacking as regards the killing of women. 

Local officials say unmarried pair killed in public in Aguelhok, in the first reported sharia killing since occupation.Islamists occupying the northern Mali town of Aguelhok have stoned an unmarried couple to death in front of about 200 people, two local government officials said.

Two years after an international outcry erupted over her sentence of stoning to death, Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani remains imprisoned in north-west Iran apparently still facing a stoning sentence.  Her lawyer, Javid Houtan Kiyan, arrested on account of his advocacy for her, remains held as a prisoner of conscience, and is reported to have been sentenced to a lengthy prison term.  He is believed to have been tortured during his detention.

The international solidarity network Women Living Under Muslim Laws (WLUML) and the Violence is Not our Culture (VNC) campaign are dismayed to receive another confirmed report of a woman – Layla Ibrahim Issa – who is about to be stoned in Sudan. This news comes shortly after the release of Intisar Sharif Abdallah, who was the first known case of a woman sentenced to stoning in Sudan last June.

Women Living Under Muslim Laws, the Violence is not our Culture Campaign, and Justice for Iran are pleased to announce the release of a new publication: Mapping Stoning in Muslim Contexts. This report locates where the punishment of stoning is still in practice, either through judicial (codified as law) or extrajudicial (outside the law) methods.   

An Iranian woman whose sentence of death by stoning for adultery provoked an international outcry could be executed by hanging instead, the country's judicial authorities have indicated.

Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani, a 44-year-old mother of two, was convicted of conducting an "illicit relationship outside marriage" in 2006 and has since been kept in Tabriz prison in the west of Iran.

A group of armed men have stoned and shot dead a woman and her daughter in Afghanistan's Ghazni province, security officials have told the BBC. The officials blamed the Taliban, who they said had accused the women of "moral deviation and adultery". The police said two men had been arrested in connection with the murder.

The attack was only 300m from the governor's office in Ghazni city, which is on a list of places to be transferred to Afghan security control.

Taliban grip

يعرض هذا البحث الملخص لمحة عامة عن الرجم في أيامنا المعاصرة، وذلك لأنه غير مبرر بما يكفي في كل من حقوق الإنسان ووجهات النظر الدينية. والرجم هو شكل من أشكال التعذيب القاسية التي تستخدم لمعاقبة الرجال والنساء في حالات الزنا والعلاقات الجنسية الأخرى ’غير المشروعة'. وفي الوقت الراهن فإن هذه العقوبة قانونية تضطلع بها الدولة في بلدين على الأقل، وقد تم رجم ما لا يقل عن سبعة أشخاص حتى الموت في السنوات الخمس الماضية.

The Iranian woman facing death by stoning after being convicted for adultery appeared on the Islamic republic's state TV channel last night to say she has not been whipped or tortured.Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani, whose stoning sentence was suspended in July, was allegedly given 99 lashes on 2 September after the Times ran a picture of an unveiled woman mistakenly identified as her, her lawyer said at the time.

We call upon the Sudan government, UN agencies, the African Union countries, Human Rights organizations, the International community and men and women of faith across the world to join hands and stop the Sudan Parliament whose majority represents the current Sudan ruling party. The parliament continues to legalise acts of violence against women and girls, by enforcing laws that directly escalate the prevalence of violence against women and girls in our society.

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