Pakistan

In 2002, Mukhtaran Mai, a Pakistani seamstress from a small village in the Punjab province was gang-raped by men from a neighbouring clan. Several men from the dominant Mastoi tribe in Meeranwalla had volunteered to rape Ms Mai as a way to settle a score after her 12-year-old brother Abdul Shakoor was seen walking with a Mastoi girl. The decision had been taken by a village court to preserve tribal honour. The jirga, or council of village elders, summoned Ms Mai to apologise for her brother's sexual misdeed. When she apologised, they gang-raped her anyway. In April 2011, the Pakistan Supreme Court upheld the verdict of the Lahore high court and ordered the release of the five acquitted men. In February, 2009, WLUML issued a call for action: Pakistan: Interference in the case of Mukhtar Mai demanding that the Pakistani authorities ensured the trial of those accused of attacking Ms. Mai went ahead without interference. Unfortunately, there continued to be political influence in her case and regular serious threats to her life and the lives of family members in an attempt to pressure her to drop the charges against the perpetrators. Sanaz Raji explains the genesis of a petition to be sent to the Supreme Court of Pakistan, below. Please consider signing it.

This study sets out to explore honour killings in the context of human rights, as a violation of international human rights law meriting the accountability of states. The study aims at providing an analysis of honour killings as a violation of human rights law, identifying the human rights provisions that may be invoked in regard to honour killings and analysing the various approaches that can be taken in order to achieve international accountability for honour killings.

This bibliography attempts to cover all areas of violence against women in the family, the community and by the state. The compilation also includes a full array of resource material from books to monographs and newspaper articles, both published and unpublished, and is broken down by country. 

Much attention has been focused on the process of radicalisation of young men in the areas of Pakistan that border Afghanistan. Peshawar, the town near the border between the two countries, is infamous for being the centre of a vibrant industry and trade in homemade guns. For more than two decades, violence has become the dominant currency of almost every aspect of life in this area of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, once known as the North West Frontier Province.

Women’s Action Forum expressed deep regret and disappointment at the Supreme Courts decision to acquit five out of six accused in the Mukhtar Mai case. Mukhtaran Mai had filed appeals against the order of the LHC, Multan Bench, commuting the sentence of one accused and acquitting the abettors involved in gang-raping Mukhtaran Mai on June 22, 2002.

Mukhtar Mai, une Pakistanaise victime d'un viol collectif et dont le sort a ému l'opinion publique internationale, a annoncé dimanche qu'elle allait contester le rejet par le Cour suprême de ses appels contre la libération de cinq de ses agresseurs.

On International Women’s Day 2011, WLUML would like to share a few of the many successes and struggles of our networkers across the world: from Malaysia, Sudan, Pakistan and Egypt.

Shirkat Gah (SG) organized an inter-university film festival on Thursday, 3rd of March 2011 at the Ali Institute of Education, as part of its campaign titled ‘Violence is not our Culture’. This event also marked 100 years of International Women’s Day (1911-2011). The event was attended by university students, Civil Society and NGO members as well as people from all walks of life.

لقي الوزير المسيحي الوحيد في الحكومة الفدرالية الباكستانية مصرعه برصاص مسلحين، وذلك على خلفية معارضته لـ"قانون التجديف". وقد جاء اغتيال وزير الأقليات، شهباز باتي، بعد شهرين فحسب من اغتيال حاكم البنجاب سلمان تسير، الذي كان يدعو هو الآخر لإصلاح هذا القانون. وقالت الشرطة إن سيارة باتي، الكاثوليكي الذي يناهز عمره الأربعينات، تعرضت لوابل من الرصاص في وضح النهار خارج بيت أسرته قرب سوق بالعاصمة إسلام آباد.

Des inconnus ont ouvert le feu et tué, mercredi 2 mars, le ministre des minorités religieuses pakistanais, le chrétien Shahbaz Bhatti, à Islamabad. Les talibans pakistanais ont revendiqué l'assassinat du ministre, expliquant leur geste par ses propos jugés blasphématoires. Des hommes armés ont tiré en rafale sur sa voiture dans un quartier huppé de la capitale, a indiqué un officier de policequi précise que les assaillants, au moins deux hommes à moto, ont pris la fuite. "Il était mort à son arrivée à l'hôpital, on lui a tiré dessus", a déclaré à l'AFP par téléphone le docteurAzmatullah Qureshi, porte-parole de l'un des plus grands hôpitaux d'Islamabad, le Shifah.

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