Malaysia

Southeast Asia Muslim human rights advocates express concerns on the growth of politicized Islam in the ASEAN region and makes recommendations to ASEAN leaders at the 15th ASEAN Summit. A regional meeting of Southeast Asian human rights advocates was held in Jakarta on 16-17 October 2009 to examine how certain interpretations of Sharia laws are affecting the rights of the women in Muslim contexts in the region and undermining secularism and democratic institutions in such countries as Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore, Thailand and the Philippines.

The arrest of a progressive ulama has plunged many Malaysians into further despair that this country is hurtling towards an implosion but it may prove a blessing in disguise.

The following, and attached, are recommendations from the Regional Meeting held in Jakarta, 16-17 October 2009. Islam in Southeast Asia has long been recognized as humane, tolerant, diverse, plural, metropolitan, progressive, and empowering of women. It is thus a matter of urgent concern that the rapid growth of Islamic extremism is now changing the landscape in Southeast Asia, with serious consequences for all living in the region, as well as for the rest of the world. Leaders of ASEAN member states are urged to be cognizant of this regressive trend, which will have serious impacts not only on women’s rights, human rights, but also on the stability and development of the region as a whole. The conservative and monolithic values that underlie this trend are intolerant of the diversity that characterizes Southeast Asia. Such extremist attitudes result in acts that marginalize women and also use terrorist tactics to eliminate diversity.

Sisters in Islam (SIS) is shocked that its application for Revision on Kartika Sari Dewi Shukarno's case was turned down by the Assistant Registrar of the Kuantan Syariah High Court on 2 October.
Founder member of AWARE, anthropologist and feminist, Vivienne Wee argues that we should all be concerned about the caning sentence passed on Madam Kartika in Pehang state.
The International Solidarity Network, Women Living Under Muslim Laws (WLUML), and the Global Campaign to Stop Killing and Stoning Women! (SKSW) are greatly concerned that the caning of Madam Kartika will shortly take place, possibly in secret.
Sisters in Islam (SIS) of Malaysia has submitted an application for revision and stay of execution of the caning sentence passed on Madam Kartika. SIS is asking the court to revise the sentence on several grounds, reminding the Malaysian government of its obligations under international law, constitutional and legal issues, and sentencing guidelines. Kartika Sari Dewi Shukarno was sentenced by the Pahang Syariah Court to be lashed six times and fined RM 5000 as punishment for drinking beer with her husband in a hotel nightclub in Cherating (Pahang state) on 12 July 2007. The mother of two was charged under Section 136 of the Pahang Islamic and Malay Traditional Practices Enactment (Amendment) 1987. We have recently learned that the same judge has passed five other sentences on Muslim men and women for alcohol consumption.
Syariah prosecution head Datuk Abdul Rahim Jaafar said the department would not announce when 32-year-old Kartika Sari Dewi Shukarno would be caned, scheduled for after Hari Raya, to avoid a "media circus".
Malaysia said Tuesday a caning sentence handed to 32 year old Kartika Sari Dewi Shukarno for drinking beer would be reviewed because it was “too harsh” and could damage the nation’s reputation.
le chef du tribunal islamique malaisien a estimé que la peine était beaucoup trop sévère et va donc réexaminer le cas de Kartika Sari Dewi Shukarno.
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