Sri Lanka

The study examines Tsunami Housing Policy of April 2006 which provided guidelines to allocate a house for a house, which in practice meant that male heads of household received the certificate of ownership even when the property was originally owned by the women members of the family.

The study sought to understand the origins and the use of the Head of the Household concept in Sri Lanka in the aftermath of the tsunami as it was used to disentitle women of post tsunami state allocated lands.

This publication identified discriminatory laws and policies in relation to state land and housing allocation and makes recommendations for reform.

The report looks at various issues pertaining to women’s ownership and control of land and property in specific areas in the North and East of Sri Lanka affected by the conflict. The report discusses practical difficulties women face in accessing and owning land, legal provisions that affect women’s access and ownership, the implications of ethnicity, caste, and religion on land and property rights as well as perceptions related women’s access to and ownership of land. Traditionally there has been a strong trend towards separate property ownership of women.

One third of women in this study claimed to own land, and the prevalence of violence reported was low (13%), but the study highlights notions of patriarchy and social norms that operated in the context of Sri Lankan society, making women passive subjects to the violence inflicted on them. The study did not find an association between the ownership of property and domestic violence; women with property and those without were found to be equally likely to report violence.

This publication analyses the Quazi Court System in Sri Lanka from the point of view of women highlighting the need for law reform to ensure equality and justice for women within Muslim law.

The four chapters in this book attempt to document and analyse contingent moments in the feminist movement in Sri Lanka as feminists have attempted to address issues of gendered violence. The introduction maps and brings together a framework through which issues of violence against women in Sri Lanka can be analysed. It looks not only at the emergence of identity politics as the dominant mode through which gender issues have been tackled, but also investigates two ways (freedom and protection) in which the movement has sought to redress gendered violence.

Sri Lanka as signatory to the CEDAW is obliged to ensure that the rights of women are protected and promoted. Yet, this study of the national legal framework clearly highlights that "the law" continues to discriminate against women in many aspects. Where violence against women is concerned, the lack of specific domestic violence legislation and the law on rape, which leaves unprotected certain groups such as young Muslim women between the ages of 12 and 16, are just some of the legal provisions which need to be amended/repealed.

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