MADRE, an international women’s human rights organization, is partnering with the Shirkat Gah Women’s Resource Center in Pakistan to deliver emergency aid to women and families in remote regions devastated by the October 8th earthquake.
The Joint Action Committee (JAC) of more than 500 volunteers from Karachi, Gwadar, Dubai and large and small towns of all four provinces has been sending relief goods including emergency medicines and daily items to the disaster-hit areas.
The survivors of the devastating October 8, 2005 earthquake in Pakistan are getting more endangered by the day.
Many thanks for those of you who have donated to help survivors of the Pakistan earthquake.
We appeal to you for assistance. The survivors of the devastating earthquake are getting more endangered by the day.
WLUML networkers have contributed to this special issue of the Muslim World Journal of Human Rights - "From the Field": Islam and human rights advocacy for social change in local contexts.
Noura Abdurrahi's four children were crying from hunger, and she knew there was food in the house. But her husband, Musa, had locked it away, out of her reach, when he had left to search for work the previous week.
Despite the extensive literature on nationalism, there are relatively few systematic attempts to analyse women’s integration into nationalist projects. The few there are convey seemingly contradictory messages. Like Jayawardena, those who link the rise of feminist movements to anti-colonial and nationalist struggles note its coincidence with a move towards secularism and a broader concern with social reform.1 Nationalist aspirations for popular sovereignty stimulate an extension of citizenship rights, clearly benefiting women.
Many feminists of colour have demonstrated the need to take into account differences among women to avoid hegemonic gender-essentialist analyses that represent the problems and interests of privileged women as paradigmatic. As feminist agendas become global, there is growing feminist concern to consider national and cultural differences among women.
The first part of the strange title of this article originates in a personal experience. In 1962, after a seven-year bloody war, which made two million victims, Algeria became independent from French colonisation. Shortly after independence, some of us were being introduced, as ‘Algerians’, to some left intellectuals in Paris who had been in favour of our liberation movement.
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