Occasional Papers

This brief report was created by WLUML as a submission to the UN Secretary General for the 27th session of the Human Rights Council (HRC) on the question of the death penalty.

Ce document occasionnel se penche sur les récentes activités de l'une des organisations membres du réseau WLUML basées au Royaume-Uni. Dr Nadje Al-Ali est networker active au Royaume-Uni, et Sundus Abass est networker active en Irak.

This Occasional Paper features recent activities of one of WLUML's networking organisations based in the UK. In addition, Dr Nadje Al-Ali is an active UK networker and Sundus Abass is an active networker in Iraq. In July 2006 Act Together, Women's Action for Iraq, hosted Sundus Abass, Director of Women in Leadership Institute, Baghdad, in London for 15 days.

Papers from the 'teach-in' organised by Act Together, Southall Black Sisters, Women Against Fundamentalisms, Women in Black (London), Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom and WLUML, held on 8 September 2002 at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London, UK.

This Occasional Paper features recent activities of Act Together, one of WLUML's networking organisations based in the UK. In July 2006 Act Together, Women's Action for Iraq, hosted Sundus Abass, Director of Women in Leadership Institute (Baghdad) in London for 15 days. WLUML helped to make the visit possible, as part of various network activities in support of women in post-conflict situations, such as in Afghanistan, Iraq and Sri Lanka. This publication is a record of some of the activities that happened during those 15 hectic days. The aim of the visit was to highlight the work that Iraqi women are doing to try to amend the new Iraqi Constitution, in particular to ensure that the pre-existing Iraqi Personal Status Law, one of the more egalitarian family laws in the Middle East, is not replaced by Article 41.

A Roundtable on Strategies to Address ‘Honour Crimes’ was held in London from 12-13 November 1999. It was jointly organised by the Centre for Islamic and Middle Eastern Law (CIMEL) at the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University and by INTERIGHTS, the International Centre for the Legal Protection of Human Rights, under the auspices of the CIMEL/INTERIGHTS ‘Honour Crimes’ Project.

The author is indebted to the American Association of University Women Education Foundation for an International fellowship enabling her to undertake this research and to Dr. Marlyn Tadros for her kind assistance in translating works relied upon in this paper.
 

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