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The death toll of Sudanese protesters dramatically increased after the night protests and the resume of the internet services at 2:00PM. The Sudanese Doctors Union, an independent union, announced to the media that there is confirmed 110 deaths in the Khartoum hospitals alone from Wednesday, 25 September, 2013 protests. The increase in the death toll also came in result of the lack of enough medical care for injured peoples, putting in mind that Sudan has no ambulance and emergency health care system that can transfer the injured victims with the international medical protocols that protect the patients’ lives. Moreover, there is serious fear among protesters from going to hospitals, in fear from being arrested. According to witnesses the numbers of injured peoples is beyond the hospitals capacities, and there is many injured peoples couldn’t have any medical care for hours or even left public hospitals to seek private medical care, which is not available for most of the poor protesters. 

Iran is reported to have freed at least 11 political prisoners, including noted human rights lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh.The eight women and three men are said to also include the reformist politician Mohsen Aminzadeh.

A dedicated human rights activist in Sudan, Abdo Alshakour Isa is being detained incommunicado with no charges, and denied access to lawyers, medical care, and visits from his family.

June 2013 marked the handover of security from NATO to Afghan forces and US troops are preparing for their final withdrawal from Afghanistan next year after more than a decade of occupation. The growing concerns of women's and human rights groups and observers both within and outside the country over the transition process are well-documented. In the approach to the handover, there has been an escalation of violence with women and children the primary casualties. While both occupying forces and insurgents have been responsible for injury and loss of civilian life, the insurgents have been at the forefront of the most recent violence.

As in Egypt, Muslim fundamentalists in Tunisia have tried to use 2011’s opening to impose their own repressive agenda. The challenge today is to effectively counter that fundamentalist agenda in non-violent and rights-respecting ways. Democratic forces need international support to achieve that.

Ahmadinejad is leaving, but the memories of his era linger, bitter mostly, for some more than others, none, perhaps, more bitter than those of the Iranian sportswomen, athletes whose challenge begins way before the starting gun and ends... well it never really ends. Here, in the Islamic Republic of Iran, whatever the name, discrimination is the game.

Nasrin Sotoudeh, 50, is an award-winning lawyer, human rights activist and mother of two who is sentenced to six years in prison. She has been detained and imprisoned since September 2010. Ms. Sotoudeh is a member of the Defenders of Human Rights Center, the One Million Signatures Campaign to Change Discriminatory Laws against Women, and the Society for Protecting the Rights of the Child.

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Women Living Under Muslim Laws International Solidarity Network (WLUML) are deeply concerned about the situation of Iranian journalist Fariba Pajooh, who has been detained since her arrest without charge on July 10, 2013 (first day of Ramadan). When her family visited the Evin Prison Court, Islamic Republic of Iran authorities informed them that Ms. Pajooh’s case file had been transferred to Branch 2 of the Shahid Moghaddas Prosecutor’s Office of the same prison. IRI authorities have reportedly instructed the family to not follow up on her case as they have reportedly guaranteed her imminent release.

On Sunday June 23, 2013, the Islamic Republic regime used Sha’baan, the holy month of Islam to temporarily release Nasrin Sotoudeh from Evin Prison. She is an award-winning lawyer, human rights activist and mother of two who is sentenced to six years in prison. Jila Baniyaghoob, award-winning journalist, women’s rights activist, and spouse of imprisoned journalist Bahman Ahmadi Amouie, was also released from Evin on the same day after she had reached the end of her one-year prison sentence.

We deplore the recent crackdown of the Turkish government on its own citizens, the clearly unjustified use of tear gas, acts of force, gas canisters and smoke bombs that have resulted in a vast number of injuries, imperiling the lives of those who seek to exercise their basic freedoms of assembly and protest.  

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