Afghanistan

A tale of abandonment, abduction, sexual assault and violence that reveals the vulnerability of women who leave the traditional Afghan home.
Violence, poids de traditions discriminatoires et insecurité restent le lot quotidien des femmes d’Afghanistan.
As with all matters relating to rebuilding the legal, social and political environments in Afghanistan, the problem of women and children in prison is very complex and needs attention from many different areas.
Three years after the overthrow of the Taliban and George Bush's declaration of victory in the first conflict in the war on terror, Afghanistan is a nation on the edge of anarchy.
Afghan journalist Shukria Dawi Barekzai is optimistic that 2004 will prove to be a turning point for women in her country.
According to the Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission, 235 women have tried to killed themselves there by self-immolation.
With just half a million Afghans registered since early December 2003, the process has a long way to go to enfranchise the estimated 10.5 million potential voters eligible to participate in elections this summer.
The international community has one more reason to ensure the security of Afghanistan -- to help bring about the women's rights promised in the country's just completed constitution, according to experts.
In an embarrassing setback for moderates in Afghanistan's U.S.-backed government, authorities have reimposed a ban on women singing on state television just days after it was lifted.
WLUML presents below a brief selection of articles from the new Constitution of Afghanistan, adopted by the Loya Jirga in Kabul on Sunday, 4th January 2004.
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